Discussion:
FLDIGI on mint 17 won't open?
(too old to reply)
Lloyd xr250-rphTv4pjVZMJGwgDXS7ZQA@public.gmane.org [linuxham]
2014-09-12 22:38:58 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Hi,
I'm new to Linux. I resurrected a dead laptop with Mint 17, and I love
it! Works great, and I have Chirp working just fine. I tried to
install FLDIGI. It says it is successfully installed, but it fails to
open when clicked on. There is no error message indicating a problem.
I tried to install more updates and libraries from the web. I'm
learning how to use the terminal and successfully updated things, but it
still will not start. There is a guy on Youtube who shows a one click
install of FLDIGI on Mint 16. It works great for him.

So, am I doing something wrong as a new Linux user, or is there a
compatibility problem with Mint 17 and FLDIGI?

So far I like Mint way better than windows. In particular, it loaded,
and successfully connected Chirp to my radio on the first try!

Thanks,
Lloyd
AI5H



------------------------------------
Posted by: Lloyd <xr250-***@public.gmane.org>
------------------------------------
Jeff Francis™ jeff-CDdbmnNP9qodnm+yROfE0A@public.gmane.org [linuxham]
2014-09-12 22:44:13 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
That's odd, I have it working great on three different Mint 17 boxes,
right out of the box. Try opening a shell and type 'fldigi' at the prompt,
and hit return. See if you get an error message.

Jeff
N0GQ


On Fri, Sep 12, 2014 at 3:38 PM, Lloyd xr250-***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] <
linuxham-***@public.gmane.org> wrote:

>
>
> Hi,
> I'm new to Linux. I resurrected a dead laptop with Mint 17, and I love
> it! Works great, and I have Chirp working just fine. I tried to
> install FLDIGI. It says it is successfully installed, but it fails to
> open when clicked on. There is no error message indicating a problem.
> I tried to install more updates and libraries from the web. I'm
> learning how to use the terminal and successfully updated things, but it
> still will not start. There is a guy on Youtube who shows a one click
> install of FLDIGI on Mint 16. It works great for him.
>
> So, am I doing something wrong as a new Linux user, or is there a
> compatibility problem with Mint 17 and FLDIGI?
>
> So far I like Mint way better than windows. In particular, it loaded,
> and successfully connected Chirp to my radio on the first try!
>
> Thanks,
> Lloyd
> AI5H
>
>
>



--
-=jeff=-
Lloyd xr250-rphTv4pjVZMJGwgDXS7ZQA@public.gmane.org [linuxham]
2014-09-12 23:06:13 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
I figured it is me, I am new to Linux.
Typing FLDIGI at the prompt gives this:
"error while loading shared libraries: libportaudio.so.2: cannot shared
object file: No such file or directory."

What I did before was search for FLDIGI under the software manager, and
did the one click install for FLDIGI.

-Lloyd

On 9/12/2014 5:44 PM, Jeff Francis™ jeff-CDdbmnNP9qodnm+***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] wrote:
> That's odd, I have it working great on three different Mint 17
> boxes, right out of the box. Try opening a shell and type 'fldigi' at
> the prompt, and hit return. See if you get an error message.
>
> Jeff
> N0GQ
>
>
> On Fri, Sep 12, 2014 at 3:38 PM, Lloyd xr250-***@public.gmane.org
> <mailto:xr250-***@public.gmane.org> [linuxham] <linuxham-***@public.gmane.org
> <mailto:linuxham-***@public.gmane.org>> wrote:
>
> Hi,
> I'm new to Linux. I resurrected a dead laptop with Mint 17, and I
> love
> it! Works great, and I have Chirp working just fine. I tried to
> install FLDIGI. It says it is successfully installed, but it fails to
> open when clicked on. There is no error message indicating a problem.
> I tried to install more updates and libraries from the web. I'm
> learning how to use the terminal and successfully updated things,
> but it
> still will not start. There is a guy on Youtube who shows a one click
> install of FLDIGI on Mint 16. It works great for him.
>
> So, am I doing something wrong as a new Linux user, or is there a
> compatibility problem with Mint 17 and FLDIGI?
>
> So far I like Mint way better than windows. In particular, it loaded,
> and successfully connected Chirp to my radio on the first try!
>
> Thanks,
> Lloyd
> AI5H
>
>
>
>
> --
> -=jeff=-
>
Jeff Francis™ jeff-CDdbmnNP9qodnm+yROfE0A@public.gmane.org [linuxham]
2014-09-12 23:15:23 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
That's odd, the installer should have taken care of the dependencies for
you. Try opening a shell and running:

sudo apt-get install --reinstall fldigi

If it somehow got installed without the correct libraries (though you
shouldn't be able to do that), this should fix it.

Jeff N0GQ


Jeff N

On Fri, Sep 12, 2014 at 4:06 PM, Lloyd xr250-***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] <
linuxham-***@public.gmane.org> wrote:

>
>
> I figured it is me, I am new to Linux.
> Typing FLDIGI at the prompt gives this:
> "error while loading shared libraries: libportaudio.so.2: cannot shared
> object file: No such file or directory."
>
> What I did before was search for FLDIGI under the software manager, and
> did the one click install for FLDIGI.
>
> -Lloyd
>
> On 9/12/2014 5:44 PM, Jeff Francis™ jeff-CDdbmnNP9qodnm+***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] wrote:
>
>
> That's odd, I have it working great on three different Mint 17 boxes,
> right out of the box. Try opening a shell and type 'fldigi' at the prompt,
> and hit return. See if you get an error message.
>
> Jeff
> N0GQ
>
>
> On Fri, Sep 12, 2014 at 3:38 PM, Lloyd xr250-***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] <
> linuxham-***@public.gmane.org> wrote:
>
>>
>>
>> Hi,
>> I'm new to Linux. I resurrected a dead laptop with Mint 17, and I love
>> it! Works great, and I have Chirp working just fine. I tried to
>> install FLDIGI. It says it is successfully installed, but it fails to
>> open when clicked on. There is no error message indicating a problem.
>> I tried to install more updates and libraries from the web. I'm
>> learning how to use the terminal and successfully updated things, but it
>> still will not start. There is a guy on Youtube who shows a one click
>> install of FLDIGI on Mint 16. It works great for him.
>>
>> So, am I doing something wrong as a new Linux user, or is there a
>> compatibility problem with Mint 17 and FLDIGI?
>>
>> So far I like Mint way better than windows. In particular, it loaded,
>> and successfully connected Chirp to my radio on the first try!
>>
>> Thanks,
>> Lloyd
>> AI5H
>>
>>
>
>
> --
> -=jeff=-
>
>
>
>



--
-=jeff=-
Jeff Francis™ jeff-CDdbmnNP9qodnm+yROfE0A@public.gmane.org [linuxham]
2014-09-12 23:16:47 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Actually, before you do that, it might be worth making sure everything is
up to date with:

sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get -y dist-upgrade

Jeff N0GQ


On Fri, Sep 12, 2014 at 4:15 PM, Jeff Francis™ <jeff-CDdbmnNP9qodnm+***@public.gmane.org> wrote:

> That's odd, the installer should have taken care of the dependencies for
> you. Try opening a shell and running:
>
> sudo apt-get install --reinstall fldigi
>
> If it somehow got installed without the correct libraries (though you
> shouldn't be able to do that), this should fix it.
>
> Jeff N0GQ
>
>
> Jeff N
>
> On Fri, Sep 12, 2014 at 4:06 PM, Lloyd xr250-***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] <
> linuxham-***@public.gmane.org> wrote:
>
>>
>>
>> I figured it is me, I am new to Linux.
>> Typing FLDIGI at the prompt gives this:
>> "error while loading shared libraries: libportaudio.so.2: cannot shared
>> object file: No such file or directory."
>>
>> What I did before was search for FLDIGI under the software manager, and
>> did the one click install for FLDIGI.
>>
>> -Lloyd
>>
>> On 9/12/2014 5:44 PM, Jeff Francis™ jeff-CDdbmnNP9qodnm+***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] wrote:
>>
>>
>> That's odd, I have it working great on three different Mint 17 boxes,
>> right out of the box. Try opening a shell and type 'fldigi' at the prompt,
>> and hit return. See if you get an error message.
>>
>> Jeff
>> N0GQ
>>
>>
>> On Fri, Sep 12, 2014 at 3:38 PM, Lloyd xr250-***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] <
>> linuxham-***@public.gmane.org> wrote:
>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Hi,
>>> I'm new to Linux. I resurrected a dead laptop with Mint 17, and I love
>>> it! Works great, and I have Chirp working just fine. I tried to
>>> install FLDIGI. It says it is successfully installed, but it fails to
>>> open when clicked on. There is no error message indicating a problem.
>>> I tried to install more updates and libraries from the web. I'm
>>> learning how to use the terminal and successfully updated things, but it
>>> still will not start. There is a guy on Youtube who shows a one click
>>> install of FLDIGI on Mint 16. It works great for him.
>>>
>>> So, am I doing something wrong as a new Linux user, or is there a
>>> compatibility problem with Mint 17 and FLDIGI?
>>>
>>> So far I like Mint way better than windows. In particular, it loaded,
>>> and successfully connected Chirp to my radio on the first try!
>>>
>>> Thanks,
>>> Lloyd
>>> AI5H
>>>
>>>
>>
>>
>> --
>> -=jeff=-
>>
>>
>>
>>
>
>
>
> --
> -=jeff=-
>



--
-=jeff=-
Ed autek-Wuw85uim5zDR7s880joybQ@public.gmane.org [linuxham]
2014-09-12 23:22:02 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On 09/12/2014 07:16 PM, Jeff Francis™ jeff-CDdbmnNP9qodnm+***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] wrote:
> Actually, before you do that, it might be worth making sure everything is
> up to date with:
>
> sudo apt-get update
> sudo apt-get -y dist-upgrade
>
> Jeff N0GQ

Please quit guessing. I know exactly what the problem is and how to
correct it.

Ed W3NR



------------------------------------
Posted by: Ed <autek-***@public.gmane.org>
------------------------------------
Lloyd xr250-rphTv4pjVZMJGwgDXS7ZQA@public.gmane.org [linuxham]
2014-09-12 23:34:52 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Thanks for your patients guys, I'm new to this.

I just now got updates. It did say that some libraries were unknown and
it asked me to remove them and return to the "original package". I said
yes. Then I did fldigi reinstall from the terminal prompt. It said
there were no changes needed and none made. Now "fldigi" at the prompt
still returns the same error "libportaudio.so.2: cannot open shared
object file: No such file or directory".

So at this point I have the initial install from the software manager
window search. Then I checked for updates, and reinstalled FLDIGI from
the terminal.

Perhaps I have a bad Mint 17 install? Being new to this, I wasn't sure
if all downloads off the internet are good? Perhaps some links can't be
trusted?

-Lloyd

On 9/12/2014 6:22 PM, Ed autek-***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] wrote:
>
> On 09/12/2014 07:16 PM, Jeff Francis™ jeff-CDdbmnNP9qodnm+***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] wrote:
> > Actually, before you do that, it might be worth making sure
> everything is
> > up to date with:
> >
> > sudo apt-get update
> > sudo apt-get -y dist-upgrade
> >
> > Jeff N0GQ
>
> Please quit guessing. I know exactly what the problem is and how to
> correct it.
>
> Ed W3NR
>
>
Ed autek-Wuw85uim5zDR7s880joybQ@public.gmane.org [linuxham]
2014-09-13 00:27:53 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On 09/12/2014 07:34 PM, Lloyd xr250-***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] wrote:
> Thanks for your patients guys, I'm new to this.
>
> I just now got updates. It did say that some libraries were unknown and
> it asked me to remove them and return to the "original package". I said
> yes.

Do not do this unless you are sure none of the programs depend on the
library.

Ed W3NR



------------------------------------
Posted by: Ed <autek-***@public.gmane.org>
------------------------------------
Ed autek-Wuw85uim5zDR7s880joybQ@public.gmane.org [linuxham]
2014-09-12 23:20:56 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On 09/12/2014 07:15 PM, Jeff Francis™ jeff-CDdbmnNP9qodnm+***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] wrote:
> That's odd, the installer should have taken care of the dependencies for
> you. Try opening a shell and running:
>
> sudo apt-get install --reinstall fldigi
>
> If it somehow got installed without the correct libraries (though you
> shouldn't be able to do that), this should fix it.
>
> Jeff N0GQ

Please quit guessing. Do you know how he insatlled fldigi ??

Ed W3NR




------------------------------------
Posted by: Ed <autek-***@public.gmane.org>
------------------------------------
Jeff Francis™ jeff-CDdbmnNP9qodnm+yROfE0A@public.gmane.org [linuxham]
2014-09-12 23:30:28 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
I do, actually. He told us:

"What I did before was search for FLDIGI under the software manager, and
did the one click install for FLDIGI."

He's missing a dependency. Specifically, he's missing libportaudio2.
Doing a re-install using apt is the easiest way to correct that for a new
user. It will automatically calculate what's missing and install it for
you. Yes, you could also do "sudo apt-get install libportaudio2". Or do
it from a GUI.

The interesting question is how fldigi got installed in the first place
without the dependencies, but my assumption is that he'd rather get it
working than debug what went wrong in the installation.

If you have a different way, by all means, please offer it up, but just
because it might be different is no excuse to refer to perfectly valid
assistance as "guessing".

Jeff N0GQ



On Fri, Sep 12, 2014 at 4:20 PM, Ed autek-***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] <
linuxham-***@public.gmane.org> wrote:

>
>
> On 09/12/2014 07:15 PM, Jeff Francis™ jeff-CDdbmnNP9qodnm+***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] wrote:
> > That's odd, the installer should have taken care of the dependencies for
> > you. Try opening a shell and running:
> >
> > sudo apt-get install --reinstall fldigi
> >
> > If it somehow got installed without the correct libraries (though you
> > shouldn't be able to do that), this should fix it.
> >
> > Jeff N0GQ
>
> Please quit guessing. Do you know how he insatlled fldigi ??
>
> Ed W3NR
>
>
>



--
-=jeff=-
Lloyd xr250-rphTv4pjVZMJGwgDXS7ZQA@public.gmane.org [linuxham]
2014-09-12 23:38:13 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Given that you all have no problems with FLDIGI, my guess is that the
install from either method works, therefore, I probably have something
wrong with my new Mint install. It wouldn't be that hard to wipe the
computer out and start over. Not to over react, it's just that I'm not
experienced enough to describe the problem better.

On 9/12/2014 6:30 PM, Jeff Francis™ jeff-CDdbmnNP9qodnm+***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] wrote:
> I do, actually. He told us:
>
> "What I did before was search for FLDIGI under the software manager,
> and did the one click install for FLDIGI."
>
> He's missing a dependency. Specifically, he's
> missing libportaudio2. Doing a re-install using apt is the easiest
> way to correct that for a new user. It will automatically calculate
> what's missing and install it for you. Yes, you could also do "sudo
> apt-get install libportaudio2". Or do it from a GUI.
>
> The interesting question is how fldigi got installed in the first
> place without the dependencies, but my assumption is that he'd rather
> get it working than debug what went wrong in the installation.
>
> If you have a different way, by all means, please offer it up, but
> just because it might be different is no excuse to refer to perfectly
> valid assistance as "guessing".
>
> Jeff N0GQ
>
>
>
> On Fri, Sep 12, 2014 at 4:20 PM, Ed autek-***@public.gmane.org
> <mailto:autek-***@public.gmane.org> [linuxham] <linuxham-***@public.gmane.org
> <mailto:linuxham-***@public.gmane.org>> wrote:
>
> On 09/12/2014 07:15 PM, Jeff Francis™ jeff-CDdbmnNP9qodnm+***@public.gmane.org
> <mailto:jeff-CDdbmnNP9qodnm+***@public.gmane.org> [linuxham] wrote:
> > That's odd, the installer should have taken care of the
> dependencies for
> > you. Try opening a shell and running:
> >
> > sudo apt-get install --reinstall fldigi
> >
> > If it somehow got installed without the correct libraries
> (though you
> > shouldn't be able to do that), this should fix it.
> >
> > Jeff N0GQ
>
> Please quit guessing. Do you know how he insatlled fldigi ??
>
> Ed W3NR
>
>
>
>
> --
> -=jeff=-
>
Jeff Francis™ jeff-CDdbmnNP9qodnm+yROfE0A@public.gmane.org [linuxham]
2014-09-12 23:57:26 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Interesting. Don't worry, anything worthwhile takes time. It's unlikely
that it should take anything as drastic as a re-installation to fix it.
There aren't many options available during the mint installation, hence
not many things to get wrong. It is odd, though, that it's not finding the
libportaudio. In the Linux world, this is the equivalent of not being able
to find a DLL on a Windows box. The libraries all (well, normall) live
under /usr/lib/. First thing to do is make sure that it's installed:

***@vader ~ $ dpkg -l | egrep "^ii.*libportaudio"
ii libportaudio2:amd64 19+svn20140130-1
amd64 Portable audio I/O - shared library
***@vader ~ $

All good. Next, see if the file is actually there. Mine is a 64-bit
system, so it shows up appropriately:

***@vader ~ $ find /usr/lib/ -print | grep -i libportaudio
/usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libportaudio.so.2
/usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libportaudio.so.2.0.0
***@vader ~ $

Next, just out of curiosity, I wanted to see if my fldigi process was
using libportaudio, so first I got the PID of the fldigi process:

***@vader ~ $ ps -efww | grep -v grep | grep fldigi
jfrancis 26420 3036 16 14:49 ? 00:19:35 fldigi
***@vader ~ $

Fldigi is PID 26420. So I check to see if PID 26420 is using
libportaudio:

***@vader ~ $ lsof | grep 26420 | grep libportaudio
fldigi 26420 jfrancis mem REG 252,0
188656 13639702 /usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libportaudio.so.2.0.0
fldigi 26420 4330 jfrancis mem REG 252,0
188656 13639702 /usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libportaudio.so.2.0.0
fldigi 26420 4533 jfrancis mem REG 252,0
188656 13639702 /usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libportaudio.so.2.0.0
fldigi 26420 26444 jfrancis mem REG 252,0
188656 13639702 /usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libportaudio.so.2.0.0
fldigi 26420 26445 jfrancis mem REG 252,0
188656 13639702 /usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libportaudio.so.2.0.0
fldigi 26420 26446 jfrancis mem REG 252,0
188656 13639702 /usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libportaudio.so.2.0.0
fldigi 26420 26456 jfrancis mem REG 252,0
188656 13639702 /usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libportaudio.so.2.0.0
fldigi 26420 26457 jfrancis mem REG 252,0
188656 13639702 /usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libportaudio.so.2.0.0
fldigi 26420 26458 jfrancis mem REG 252,0
188656 13639702 /usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libportaudio.so.2.0.0
fldigi 26420 26459 jfrancis mem REG 252,0
188656 13639702 /usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libportaudio.so.2.0.0
***@vader ~ $

You can also ask linux to show you debugging output from the libraries it
loads:

***@vader ~ $ export LD_DEBUG=files
***@vader ~ $ fldigi 2>&1 | grep portaudio
28911: file=libportaudio.so.2 [0]; needed by fldigi [0]
28911: file=libportaudio.so.2 [0]; generating link map
28911: file=librt.so.1 [0]; needed by
/usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libportaudio.so.2 [0]
28911: file=libasound.so.2 [0]; needed by
/usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libportaudio.so.2 [0]
28911: file=libjack.so.0 [0]; needed by
/usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libportaudio.so.2 [0]
28911: calling init: /usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libportaudio.so.2

Yep, so far, so good. It's definitely in use by the process. None of
this solves your problem, but it's good for making sure all of the
assumptions about the library are correct (nor is this something you'd
normally need to do - something is odd in your setup). Don't fear, this
isn't normal day-to-day stuff you need to know to use linux effectively.

So the question is, why isn't your machine finding libportaudio? I guess
I would start with two items:

1. Make sure the library is actually installed. Run "dpkg -l | grep
libportaudio" and see if it shows up with an "ii" all the way in the
left-most column. If it's anything else, it's not installed.
2. Run "find /usr/lib/ -print | grep libportaudio" and make sure it
actually finds the library in the filesystem. It should return one or two
file names. If you just get the prompt back, the files are missing.

We can take the debugging from there, depending on what the results are.

I'm heading out the door shortly to see a movie with my wife, but we can
pick this up tomorrow if it's still not working. Or Ed might have an idea
that I haven't thought of.

Jeff N0GQ




On Fri, Sep 12, 2014 at 4:38 PM, Lloyd xr250-***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] <
linuxham-***@public.gmane.org> wrote:

>
>
> Given that you all have no problems with FLDIGI, my guess is that the
> install from either method works, therefore, I probably have something
> wrong with my new Mint install. It wouldn't be that hard to wipe the
> computer out and start over. Not to over react, it's just that I'm not
> experienced enough to describe the problem better.
>
> On 9/12/2014 6:30 PM, Jeff Francis™ jeff-CDdbmnNP9qodnm+***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] wrote:
>
>
> I do, actually. He told us:
>
> "What I did before was search for FLDIGI under the software manager,
> and did the one click install for FLDIGI."
>
> He's missing a dependency. Specifically, he's missing libportaudio2.
> Doing a re-install using apt is the easiest way to correct that for a new
> user. It will automatically calculate what's missing and install it for
> you. Yes, you could also do "sudo apt-get install libportaudio2". Or do
> it from a GUI.
>
> The interesting question is how fldigi got installed in the first
> place without the dependencies, but my assumption is that he'd rather get
> it working than debug what went wrong in the installation.
>
> If you have a different way, by all means, please offer it up, but
> just because it might be different is no excuse to refer to perfectly valid
> assistance as "guessing".
>
> Jeff N0GQ
>
>
>
> On Fri, Sep 12, 2014 at 4:20 PM, Ed autek-***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] <
> linuxham-***@public.gmane.org> wrote:
>
>>
>>
>> On 09/12/2014 07:15 PM, Jeff Francis™ jeff-CDdbmnNP9qodnm+***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] wrote:
>> > That's odd, the installer should have taken care of the dependencies for
>> > you. Try opening a shell and running:
>> >
>> > sudo apt-get install --reinstall fldigi
>> >
>> > If it somehow got installed without the correct libraries (though you
>> > shouldn't be able to do that), this should fix it.
>> >
>> > Jeff N0GQ
>>
>> Please quit guessing. Do you know how he insatlled fldigi ??
>>
>> Ed W3NR
>>
>>
>
>
> --
> -=jeff=-
>
>
>
>



--
-=jeff=-
Jeff KP3FT kp3ft-/E1597aS9LQAvxtiuMwx3w@public.gmane.org [linuxham]
2014-09-13 00:15:29 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Might be easier to do as you suggested... start from a clean slate and reinstall Mint 17 on the same partition. Ater that, apply the first update (it should be a single one), then the next update which is around 297. Restart and try installing FLDigi again.



________________________________
From: "Lloyd xr250-***@public.gmane.org [linuxham]" <linuxham-***@public.gmane.org>
To: linuxham-***@public.gmane.org
Sent: Friday, September 12, 2014 7:38 PM
Subject: Re: [linuxham] FLDIGI on mint 17 won't open?




Given that you all have no problems with FLDIGI, my guess is that the install from either method works, therefore, I probably have something wrong with my new Mint install. It wouldn't be that hard to wipe the computer out and start over. Not to over react, it's just that I'm not experienced enough to describe the problem better.




On 9/12/2014 6:30 PM, Jeff Francis™ jeff-CDdbmnNP9qodnm+***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] wrote:


> I do, actually. He told us:
>
>
> "What I did before was search for FLDIGI under the software manager, and did the one click install for FLDIGI."
>
>
> He's missing a dependency. Specifically, he's missing libportaudio2. Doing a re-install using apt is the easiest way to correct that for a new user. It will automatically calculate what's missing and install it for you. Yes, you could also do "sudo apt-get install libportaudio2". Or do it from a GUI.
>
>
> The interesting question is how fldigi got installed in the first place without the dependencies, but my assumption is that he'd rather get it working than debug what went wrong in the installation.
>
>
>
> If you have a different way, by all means, please offer it up, but just because it might be different is no excuse to refer to perfectly valid assistance as "guessing".
>
>
>Jeff N0GQ
>
>
>
>
>
>
>On Fri, Sep 12, 2014 at 4:20 PM, Ed autek-***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] <***@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
>
>
>>On 09/12/2014 07:15 PM, Jeff Francis™ jeff-CDdbmnNP9qodnm+***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] wrote:
>>> That's odd, the installer should have
taken care of the dependencies for
>>> you. Try opening a shell and running:
>>>
>>> sudo apt-get install --reinstall
fldigi
>>>
>>> If it somehow got installed without
the correct libraries (though you
>>> shouldn't be able to do that), this
should fix it.
>>>
>>> Jeff N0GQ
>>
>> Please quit guessing. Do you know how he insatlled fldigi ??
>>
>>Ed W3NR
>>
>>
>
>
>
>
--
>-=jeff=-
>
Ed autek-Wuw85uim5zDR7s880joybQ@public.gmane.org [linuxham]
2014-09-13 00:25:02 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On 09/12/2014 08:15 PM, Jeff KP3FT kp3ft-/***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] wrote:
> Might be easier to do as you suggested... start from a clean slate
> and reinstall Mint 17 on the same partition. Ater that, apply the
> first update (it should be a single one), then the next update which
> is around 297. Restart and try installing FLDigi again.

Sounds like something a MS person would suggest.

Ed W3NR


------------------------------------
Posted by: Ed <autek-***@public.gmane.org>
------------------------------------
Jeff KP3FT kp3ft-/E1597aS9LQAvxtiuMwx3w@public.gmane.org [linuxham]
2014-09-13 01:03:29 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
No. I'm rabidly anti-Microsoft, for many years. What I am suggesting is simply starting over for the sake of practicality. I've installed many Linux and other OS distros on many computers. Occasionally the easiest fix is to simply start over. It takes what, five, ten, twenty minutes to do it, depending? Linux is free, and installation is relatively quick. Maybe there's bad libs or bins from a corrupted or dirty ISO CD, or from trying various fixes.





________________________________
From: "Ed autek-***@public.gmane.org [linuxham]" <linuxham-***@public.gmane.org>
To: linuxham-***@public.gmane.org
Sent: Friday, September 12, 2014 8:25 PM
Subject: Re: [linuxham] FLDIGI on mint 17 won't open?




On 09/12/2014 08:15 PM, Jeff KP3FT kp3ft-/***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] wrote:
> Might be easier to do as you suggested... start from a clean slate
> and reinstall Mint 17 on the same partition. Ater that, apply the
> first update (it should be a single one), then the next update which
> is around 297. Restart and try installing FLDigi again.

Sounds like something a MS person would suggest.

Ed W3NR
Lloyd xr250-rphTv4pjVZMJGwgDXS7ZQA@public.gmane.org [linuxham]
2014-09-13 01:36:07 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
I have wondered about this. As a new guy, are there certain sites I
should stick to for a known good copy of Linux? Also, is it true that I
don't need stand alone virus protection with Linux?
On 9/12/2014 8:03 PM, Jeff KP3FT kp3ft-/***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] wrote:
> No. I'm rabidly anti-Microsoft, for many years. What I am suggesting
> is simply starting over for the sake of practicality. I've installed
> many Linux and other OS distros on many computers. Occasionally the
> easiest fix is to simply start over. It takes what, five, ten, twenty
> minutes to do it, depending? Linux is free, and installation is
> relatively quick. Maybe there's bad libs or bins from a corrupted or
> dirty ISO CD, or from trying various fixes.
>
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
> *From:* "Ed autek-***@public.gmane.org [linuxham]" <linuxham-***@public.gmane.org>
> *To:* linuxham-***@public.gmane.org
> *Sent:* Friday, September 12, 2014 8:25 PM
> *Subject:* Re: [linuxham] FLDIGI on mint 17 won't open?
>
> On 09/12/2014 08:15 PM, Jeff KP3FT kp3ft-/***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] wrote:
> > Might be easier to do as you suggested... start from a clean slate
> > and reinstall Mint 17 on the same partition. Ater that, apply the
> > first update (it should be a single one), then the next update which
> > is around 297. Restart and try installing FLDigi again.
>
> Sounds like something a MS person would suggest.
>
> Ed W3NR
>
>
>
Ed autek-Wuw85uim5zDR7s880joybQ@public.gmane.org [linuxham]
2014-09-13 02:25:40 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On 09/12/2014 09:36 PM, Lloyd xr250-***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] wrote:
> I have wondered about this. As a new guy, are there certain sites I
> should stick to for a known good copy of Linux? Also, is it true
> that I don't need stand alone virus protection with Linux?

Since you are using Mint, this is the official site::

http://www.linuxmint.com/

Ed W3NR



------------------------------------
Posted by: Ed <autek-***@public.gmane.org>
------------------------------------
Lloyd xr250-rphTv4pjVZMJGwgDXS7ZQA@public.gmane.org [linuxham]
2014-09-13 02:39:20 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Thanks for everyone's advice! I'm thinking I'll go ahead and
reinstall. I want to let everyone know that so you don't waste time
thinking about it, when I've already quit.

I think I'll go with the 32 bit install this time. Question: Last time
I did the recommended install with it choosing the partition sizes for
me. Is that the best for a new guy?

On 9/12/2014 9:25 PM, Ed autek-***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] wrote:
>
> On 09/12/2014 09:36 PM, Lloyd xr250-***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] wrote:
> > I have wondered about this. As a new guy, are there certain sites I
> > should stick to for a known good copy of Linux? Also, is it true
> > that I don't need stand alone virus protection with Linux?
>
> Since you are using Mint, this is the official site::
>
> http://www.linuxmint.com/
>
> Ed W3NR
>
>
Ed autek-Wuw85uim5zDR7s880joybQ@public.gmane.org [linuxham]
2014-09-13 03:11:20 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On 09/12/2014 10:39 PM, Lloyd xr250-***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] wrote:
> Thanks for everyone's advice! I'm thinking I'll go ahead and
> reinstall. I want to let everyone know that so you don't waste time
> thinking about it, when I've already quit.
>
> I think I'll go with the 32 bit install this time. Question: Last time
> I did the recommended install with it choosing the partition sizes for
> me. Is that the best for a new guy?

As long as its at least 20gig you should be fine.

Ed W3NR



------------------------------------
Posted by: Ed <autek-***@public.gmane.org>
------------------------------------
Lloyd xr250-rphTv4pjVZMJGwgDXS7ZQA@public.gmane.org [linuxham]
2014-09-13 04:47:43 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
I started over, and it works! I realize it is a rookie move, but it
only took 15 minutes. I formatted my USB stick, and downloaded the 32
bit version of Mint 17. Then installed it. I have FLDIGI running fine
with the click to install from the software manager.

I guess I could have just done that myself from the beginning, but
wasn't sure. Thanks for everyone's input. The way I look at it is this
job used to take hours on Windows, not counting all the software. Now
it's just minutes and most of my favorite software is already pre-installed!

Thanks!
Lloyd


On 9/12/2014 10:11 PM, Ed autek-***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] wrote:
>
> On 09/12/2014 10:39 PM, Lloyd xr250-***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] wrote:
> > Thanks for everyone's advice! I'm thinking I'll go ahead and
> > reinstall. I want to let everyone know that so you don't waste time
> > thinking about it, when I've already quit.
> >
> > I think I'll go with the 32 bit install this time. Question: Last time
> > I did the recommended install with it choosing the partition sizes for
> > me. Is that the best for a new guy?
>
> As long as its at least 20gig you should be fine.
>
> Ed W3NR
>
>
Ernest Wagner aa1ad-WYrOkVUspZo@public.gmane.org [linuxham]
2014-09-13 05:30:37 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Congratulations Lloyd!
What you experienced has the symptoms of installing a 32 bit application
on a 64 bit system. On most Linux systems, the 32 bit and 64 bit
libraries are in different locations. A properly built package shouldn't
allow that to happen though.

Your next project might be to learn to build and install from source, so
it won't matter too much whether your system is 32 bit (i686) or 64 bit
(x86_64).

Although the unknown libraries in the update has me puzzled and
wondering if the install disk wasn't a genuine LinuxMint install image.

Usually there is a hash tag such as sha1, md5 that is offered by
genuine download sites such as LinuxMint.org that can be used to check
if the image has been altered.

I did a search for Linux Mint and found many download sites such as
cdnet. I wonder how many of them are offering altered images.

--
73 From Ernie D

AA1AD | CN87ug

-----Original Message-----
From: Lloyd xr250-***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] <linuxham-***@public.gmane.org>
Reply-to: linuxham-***@public.gmane.org
To: linuxham-***@public.gmane.org
Subject: Re: [linuxham] FLDIGI on mint 17 won't open?
Date: Fri, 12 Sep 2014 23:47:43 -0500


I started over, and it works! I realize it is a rookie move, but it
only took 15 minutes. I formatted my USB stick, and downloaded the 32
bit version of Mint 17. Then installed it. I have FLDIGI running fine
with the click to install from the software manager.

I guess I could have just done that myself from the beginning, but
wasn't sure. Thanks for everyone's input. The way I look at it is this
job used to take hours on Windows, not counting all the software. Now
it's just minutes and most of my favorite software is already
pre-installed!

Thanks!
Lloyd




On 9/12/2014 10:11 PM, Ed autek-***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] wrote:

>
> On 09/12/2014 10:39 PM, Lloyd xr250-***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] wrote:
> > Thanks for everyone's advice! I'm thinking I'll go ahead and
> > reinstall. I want to let everyone know that so you don't waste time
> > thinking about it, when I've already quit.
> >
> > I think I'll go with the 32 bit install this time. Question: Last
> time
> > I did the recommended install with it choosing the partition sizes
> for
> > me. Is that the best for a new guy?
>
> As long as its at least 20gig you should be fine.
>
> Ed W3NR
>
>
>
>








------------------------------------
Posted by: Ernest Wagner <wagnered-***@public.gmane.org>
------------------------------------
Lloyd xr250-rphTv4pjVZMJGwgDXS7ZQA@public.gmane.org [linuxham]
2014-09-13 06:07:02 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Good point, and something I was concerned about as a new Linux user.
After doing it the second time, I see that I did in fact use the genuine
site to download the first time. The only apparent difference to me is
32 bit versus 64.

At any rate, within a half hour, I had it running and was connecting to
my radio with Chirp, which is much easier now since I didn't fight with
windows driver and com port issues. And, I now have the laptop running
fldigi on Mint, and communicating with the desktop via mic/speakers in
the same room. The desktop is running fldigi on Windows 7. So I had my
first test run of fldigi within a few minutes of fixing the laptop!
Adding the radio portion instead of open air mic/speakers is the easy
part for me.

The next challenge: Learning how to use server/clients to implement my
own ad-hoc network via mesh. I have the routers and flashed them, but I
don't know how to offer "advertised services" from one machine to the
clients.

-Lloyd



On 9/13/2014 12:30 AM, Ernest Wagner aa1ad-***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] wrote:
>
> Congratulations Lloyd!
> What you experienced has the symptoms of installing a 32 bit application
> on a 64 bit system. On most Linux systems, the 32 bit and 64 bit
> libraries are in different locations. A properly built package shouldn't
> allow that to happen though.
>
> Your next project might be to learn to build and install from source, so
> it won't matter too much whether your system is 32 bit (i686) or 64 bit
> (x86_64).
>
> Although the unknown libraries in the update has me puzzled and
> wondering if the install disk wasn't a genuine LinuxMint install image.
>
> Usually there is a hash tag such as sha1, md5 that is offered by
> genuine download sites such as LinuxMint.org that can be used to check
> if the image has been altered.
>
> I did a search for Linux Mint and found many download sites such as
> cdnet. I wonder how many of them are offering altered images.
>
> --
> 73 From Ernie D
>
> AA1AD | CN87ug
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Lloyd xr250-***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] <linuxham-***@public.gmane.org>
> Reply-to: linuxham-***@public.gmane.org
> To: linuxham-***@public.gmane.org
> Subject: Re: [linuxham] FLDIGI on mint 17 won't open?
> Date: Fri, 12 Sep 2014 23:47:43 -0500
>
> I started over, and it works! I realize it is a rookie move, but it
> only took 15 minutes. I formatted my USB stick, and downloaded the 32
> bit version of Mint 17. Then installed it. I have FLDIGI running fine
> with the click to install from the software manager.
>
> I guess I could have just done that myself from the beginning, but
> wasn't sure. Thanks for everyone's input. The way I look at it is this
> job used to take hours on Windows, not counting all the software. Now
> it's just minutes and most of my favorite software is already
> pre-installed!
>
> Thanks!
> Lloyd
>
> On 9/12/2014 10:11 PM, Ed autek-***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] wrote:
>
> >
> > On 09/12/2014 10:39 PM, Lloyd xr250-***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] wrote:
> > > Thanks for everyone's advice! I'm thinking I'll go ahead and
> > > reinstall. I want to let everyone know that so you don't waste time
> > > thinking about it, when I've already quit.
> > >
> > > I think I'll go with the 32 bit install this time. Question: Last
> > time
> > > I did the recommended install with it choosing the partition sizes
> > for
> > > me. Is that the best for a new guy?
> >
> > As long as its at least 20gig you should be fine.
> >
> > Ed W3NR
> >
> >
> >
> >
>
>
Ernest Wagner aa1ad-WYrOkVUspZo@public.gmane.org [linuxham]
2014-09-13 22:49:59 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Are you referring to advertising availability as a node? The mesh
firmware does that as I understand. If you are referring to
applications: The particular application whether a print server, or
whatever will use some form of Service Discovery Protocol to let clients
know the service is available.

What I don't understand, and I read/viewed a lot of info on
broadband-hamnet.org and the radio aspect is only cursorily mentioned.
I don't understand the connection to the radio, unless the radio is
interfaced via some packet-to-ip converter or VOIP software/hardware.
OK, So I am starting to get the picture. Hi, Hi.

--
73 From Ernie D

AA1AD | CN87ug

-----Original Message-----
From: Lloyd xr250-***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] <linuxham-***@public.gmane.org>
Reply-to: linuxham-***@public.gmane.org
To: linuxham-***@public.gmane.org
Subject: Re: [linuxham] FLDIGI on mint 17 won't open?
Date: Sat, 13 Sep 2014 01:07:02 -0500


Good point, and something I was concerned about as a new Linux user.
After doing it the second time, I see that I did in fact use the genuine
site to download the first time. The only apparent difference to me is
32 bit versus 64.

At any rate, within a half hour, I had it running and was connecting to
my radio with Chirp, which is much easier now since I didn't fight with
windows driver and com port issues. And, I now have the laptop running
fldigi on Mint, and communicating with the desktop via mic/speakers in
the same room. The desktop is running fldigi on Windows 7. So I had my
first test run of fldigi within a few minutes of fixing the laptop!
Adding the radio portion instead of open air mic/speakers is the easy
part for me.

The next challenge: Learning how to use server/clients to implement my
own ad-hoc network via mesh. I have the routers and flashed them, but I
don't know how to offer "advertised services" from one machine to the
clients.

-Lloyd





On 9/13/2014 12:30 AM, Ernest Wagner aa1ad-***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] wrote:

>
> Congratulations Lloyd!
> What you experienced has the symptoms of installing a 32 bit
> application
> on a 64 bit system. On most Linux systems, the 32 bit and 64 bit
> libraries are in different locations. A properly built package
> shouldn't
> allow that to happen though.
>
> Your next project might be to learn to build and install from source,
> so
> it won't matter too much whether your system is 32 bit (i686) or 64
> bit
> (x86_64).
>
> Although the unknown libraries in the update has me puzzled and
> wondering if the install disk wasn't a genuine LinuxMint install
> image.
>
> Usually there is a hash tag such as sha1, md5 that is offered by
> genuine download sites such as LinuxMint.org that can be used to check
> if the image has been altered.
>
> I did a search for Linux Mint and found many download sites such as
> cdnet. I wonder how many of them are offering altered images.
>
> --
> 73 From Ernie D
>
> AA1AD | CN87ug
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Lloyd xr250-***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] <linuxham-***@public.gmane.org>
> Reply-to: linuxham-***@public.gmane.org
> To: linuxham-***@public.gmane.org
> Subject: Re: [linuxham] FLDIGI on mint 17 won't open?
> Date: Fri, 12 Sep 2014 23:47:43 -0500
>
> I started over, and it works! I realize it is a rookie move, but it
> only took 15 minutes. I formatted my USB stick, and downloaded the 32
> bit version of Mint 17. Then installed it. I have FLDIGI running fine
> with the click to install from the software manager.
>
> I guess I could have just done that myself from the beginning, but
> wasn't sure. Thanks for everyone's input. The way I look at it is this
> job used to take hours on Windows, not counting all the software. Now
> it's just minutes and most of my favorite software is already
> pre-installed!
>
> Thanks!
> Lloyd
>
> On 9/12/2014 10:11 PM, Ed autek-***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] wrote:
>
> >
> > On 09/12/2014 10:39 PM, Lloyd xr250-***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] wrote:
> > > Thanks for everyone's advice! I'm thinking I'll go ahead and
> > > reinstall. I want to let everyone know that so you don't waste
> time
> > > thinking about it, when I've already quit.
> > >
> > > I think I'll go with the 32 bit install this time. Question: Last
> > time
> > > I did the recommended install with it choosing the partition sizes
> > for
> > > me. Is that the best for a new guy?
> >
> > As long as its at least 20gig you should be fine.
> >
> > Ed W3NR
> >
> >
> >
> >
>
>
>
>








------------------------------------
Posted by: Ernest Wagner <wagnered-***@public.gmane.org>
------------------------------------
Jeff Francis™ jeff-CDdbmnNP9qodnm+yROfE0A@public.gmane.org [linuxham]
2014-09-13 16:28:07 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Glad you're up and running. FLdigi is awesome (as is linux).

As the immortal saying goes, "Unix is user friendly. It's just selective
about who its friends are." Looks like you're now a friend. ;^)


Jeff N0GQ


On Fri, Sep 12, 2014 at 10:30 PM, Ernest Wagner aa1ad-***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] <
linuxham-***@public.gmane.org> wrote:

>
>
> Congratulations Lloyd!
> What you experienced has the symptoms of installing a 32 bit application
> on a 64 bit system. On most Linux systems, the 32 bit and 64 bit
> libraries are in different locations. A properly built package shouldn't
> allow that to happen though.
>
> Your next project might be to learn to build and install from source, so
> it won't matter too much whether your system is 32 bit (i686) or 64 bit
> (x86_64).
>
> Although the unknown libraries in the update has me puzzled and
> wondering if the install disk wasn't a genuine LinuxMint install image.
>
> Usually there is a hash tag such as sha1, md5 that is offered by
> genuine download sites such as LinuxMint.org that can be used to check
> if the image has been altered.
>
> I did a search for Linux Mint and found many download sites such as
> cdnet. I wonder how many of them are offering altered images.
>
> --
> 73 From Ernie D
>
> AA1AD | CN87ug
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Lloyd xr250-***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] <linuxham-***@public.gmane.org>
> Reply-to: linuxham-***@public.gmane.org
> To: linuxham-***@public.gmane.org
> Subject: Re: [linuxham] FLDIGI on mint 17 won't open?
> Date: Fri, 12 Sep 2014 23:47:43 -0500
>
> I started over, and it works! I realize it is a rookie move, but it
> only took 15 minutes. I formatted my USB stick, and downloaded the 32
> bit version of Mint 17. Then installed it. I have FLDIGI running fine
> with the click to install from the software manager.
>
> I guess I could have just done that myself from the beginning, but
> wasn't sure. Thanks for everyone's input. The way I look at it is this
> job used to take hours on Windows, not counting all the software. Now
> it's just minutes and most of my favorite software is already
> pre-installed!
>
> Thanks!
> Lloyd
>
> On 9/12/2014 10:11 PM, Ed autek-***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] wrote:
>
> >
> > On 09/12/2014 10:39 PM, Lloyd xr250-***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] wrote:
> > > Thanks for everyone's advice! I'm thinking I'll go ahead and
> > > reinstall. I want to let everyone know that so you don't waste time
> > > thinking about it, when I've already quit.
> > >
> > > I think I'll go with the 32 bit install this time. Question: Last
> > time
> > > I did the recommended install with it choosing the partition sizes
> > for
> > > me. Is that the best for a new guy?
> >
> > As long as its at least 20gig you should be fine.
> >
> > Ed W3NR
> >
> >
> >
> >
>
>
>



--
-=jeff=-
Jeff Francis™ jeff-CDdbmnNP9qodnm+yROfE0A@public.gmane.org [linuxham]
2014-09-13 16:23:40 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Do you need stand-along virus protection for Linux? I'd say no, but
that's a qualified no. There most certainly is malware that attacks and
infects linux. It's probably 1/10000th of the amount that's written for
Windows or Android, but that doesn't mean it doesn't exist. On the other
hand, it doesn't tend to propagate the way Windows viruses do. Linux
malware is about 99% based on exploiting bugs in server software (like
bind, apache, and tomcat). The other 1% is file attachments in PDFs, java,
and that kind of thing. So it exists, but it tends to mainly target
servers. The reality is that if you're not running a server on the open
internet, you've probably got very little to worry about. And even if you
do, the odds are still with you. I've run FreeBSD, Linux, Solaris, HP/UX,
AIX, and SunOS servers for 20+ years, and I can count the number of times a
machine was successfully hacked on one hand. That's not saying I'm the
world's greatest sysadmin, it's just saying that I did some very basic
security-related things (keep the systems patched, don't run services you
don't need, and use good passwords) combined with the fact that attacks
just aren't all that common.

If you're going to leave ssh open to the open internet (which is quite
common, so you can log into your home system remotely), do three things:

1. Move it off of the default port 22. Anything is better than the
default port. I usually use 2222. It most certainly does not make you
immune from attack, but it does weed out 99% of the "script kiddie"
attacks, which are nothing more than the digital equivalent of rattling the
front doorknob of every house on a street to see if any were left unlocked.
2. Use a good password. And by good, I don't mean "combines some
letter, numbers, upper case, and punctuation and is eight characters long".
By good, I mean long. Take four random words (non-English is ever
better), string them together with no spaces, capitalize one or two of
them, and add a number on the end. These days, attacks are all about
length, not complexity. Google "rainbow tables" for more information.
3. Last, but not least, run something that detects repeated failed login
requests and blocks that IP source address for a period of time. There are
many. fail2ban is one. It's as simple as "sudo apt-get install fail2ban"
and you're covered.

None of this is necessary if you don't forward port tcp/22 from the
Internet (which most people don't).

Whatever you do, don't simply forward all ports from your Internet
connection to your Linux box. Be selective. At most, you'll probably want
tcp/22 and tcp/80 (for ssh and http). Better yet, if you need to get into
your home machine remotely, run OpenVPN and forward nothing but udp/10000
(and run the OpenVPN server or udp/10000). Then you've got precisely one
possible avenue of attack, and it's a pretty tough one.

Personally, I also run a commercial firewall and IPS in front of my home
network, but that's 'cause I'm ultra-paranoid from working in the computer
security industry for so many years (plus I get the gear for free). Linux
is actually reasonably secure all by itself. Not bulletproof, but probably
two orders of magnitude more so than Windows or Android (the two cesspools
of malware in the digital world).

Jeff N0GQ


On Fri, Sep 12, 2014 at 6:36 PM, Lloyd xr250-***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] <
linuxham-***@public.gmane.org> wrote:

>
>
> I have wondered about this. As a new guy, are there certain sites I
> should stick to for a known good copy of Linux? Also, is it true that I
> don't need stand alone virus protection with Linux?
> On 9/12/2014 8:03 PM, Jeff KP3FT kp3ft-/***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] wrote:
>
>
> No. I'm rabidly anti-Microsoft, for many years. What I am suggesting
> is simply starting over for the sake of practicality. I've installed many
> Linux and other OS distros on many computers. Occasionally the easiest fix
> is to simply start over. It takes what, five, ten, twenty minutes to do
> it, depending? Linux is free, and installation is relatively quick. Maybe
> there's bad libs or bins from a corrupted or dirty ISO CD, or from trying
> various fixes.
>
>
> ------------------------------
> *From:* "Ed autek-***@public.gmane.org [linuxham]" <linuxham-***@public.gmane.org>
> <linuxham-***@public.gmane.org>
> *To:* linuxham-***@public.gmane.org
> *Sent:* Friday, September 12, 2014 8:25 PM
> *Subject:* Re: [linuxham] FLDIGI on mint 17 won't open?
>
>
> On 09/12/2014 08:15 PM, Jeff KP3FT kp3ft-/***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] wrote:
> > Might be easier to do as you suggested... start from a clean slate
> > and reinstall Mint 17 on the same partition. Ater that, apply the
> > first update (it should be a single one), then the next update which
> > is around 297. Restart and try installing FLDigi again.
>
> Sounds like something a MS person would suggest.
>
> Ed W3NR
>
>
>
>
>



--
-=jeff=-
'qrv-JH0e/pQ7GQk@public.gmane.org' qrv-JH0e/pQ7GQk@public.gmane.org [linuxham]
2014-09-13 16:37:00 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Hey Jeff!

Great stuff, I'm saving this one. :-) I also forwarded it
to my IT-major son.

One quibble - I never use the google search engine as it's
too badly manipulated & they generally disrespect privacy.

I Search (not google) using duckduckgo.com or ixquick.com
and others use startpage.com or others.

I will never adapt to calling a Search "google" nor will
I sell-out to the Microsoft claim that they are windows since
every OS uses a form of "windows" - and it's a technology that
Microsoft did not invent.

Rant mode off ...

Thanks again for the excellent ssh security tips!

David KD4E
> Do you need stand-along virus protection for Linux? I'd say no, but
> that's a qualified no. There most certainly is malware that attacks and
> infects linux. It's probably 1/10000th of the amount that's written for
> Windows or Android, but that doesn't mean it doesn't exist. On the
> other hand, it doesn't tend to propagate the way Windows viruses do.
> Linux malware is about 99% based on exploiting bugs in server software
> (like bind, apache, and tomcat). The other 1% is file attachments in
> PDFs, java, and that kind of thing. So it exists, but it tends to
> mainly target servers. The reality is that if you're not running a
> server on the open internet, you've probably got very little to worry
> about. And even if you do, the odds are still with you. I've run
> FreeBSD, Linux, Solaris, HP/UX, AIX, and SunOS servers for 20+ years,
> and I can count the number of times a machine was successfully hacked on
> one hand. That's not saying I'm the world's greatest sysadmin, it's
> just saying that I did some very basic security-related things (keep the
> systems patched, don't run services you don't need, and use good
> passwords) combined with the fact that attacks just aren't all that common.
>
> If you're going to leave ssh open to the open internet (which is quite
> common, so you can log into your home system remotely), do three things:
>
> 1. Move it off of the default port 22. Anything is better than the
> default port. I usually use 2222. It most certainly does not make you
> immune from attack, but it does weed out 99% of the "script kiddie"
> attacks, which are nothing more than the digital equivalent of rattling
> the front doorknob of every house on a street to see if any were left
> unlocked.
> 2. Use a good password. And by good, I don't mean "combines some
> letter, numbers, upper case, and punctuation and is eight characters
> long". By good, I mean long. Take four random words (non-English is
> ever better), string them together with no spaces, capitalize one or two
> of them, and add a number on the end. These days, attacks are all about
> length, not complexity. Google "rainbow tables" for more information.
> 3. Last, but not least, run something that detects repeated failed
> login requests and blocks that IP source address for a period of time.
> There are many. fail2ban is one. It's as simple as "sudo apt-get
> install fail2ban" and you're covered.
>
> None of this is necessary if you don't forward port tcp/22 from the
> Internet (which most people don't).
>
> Whatever you do, don't simply forward all ports from your Internet
> connection to your Linux box. Be selective. At most, you'll probably
> want tcp/22 and tcp/80 (for ssh and http). Better yet, if you need to
> get into your home machine remotely, run OpenVPN and forward nothing but
> udp/10000 (and run the OpenVPN server or udp/10000). Then you've got
> precisely one possible avenue of attack, and it's a pretty tough one.
>
> Personally, I also run a commercial firewall and IPS in front of my
> home network, but that's 'cause I'm ultra-paranoid from working in the
> computer security industry for so many years (plus I get the gear for
> free). Linux is actually reasonably secure all by itself. Not
> bulletproof, but probably two orders of magnitude more so than Windows
> or Android (the two cesspools of malware in the digital world).
>
> Jeff N0GQ


--

David Colburn, KD4E - Nevils, Georgia USA

Safe & Secure Search Engine: duckduckgo.com

Android for Hams: groups.yahoo.com/group/hamdroid
Creative Tech: groups.yahoo.com/group/ham-macguyver
Raspi Alternative: groups.yahoo.com/group/beagleboneblack/

Restored to design-spec at Heaven's gate 1Cor15:22


------------------------------------
Posted by: "qrv-JH0e/***@public.gmane.org" <qrv-JH0e/***@public.gmane.org>
------------------------------------
KI7MT ki7mt-/E1597aS9LQAvxtiuMwx3w@public.gmane.org [linuxham]
2014-09-13 16:44:35 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
In addition to what Jeff said regarding SSH, use SSH Keys for for "all"
your connections, local LAN and remote connections. Use a strong key
pass-phrase. Do not use the same PW's for your normal user, admin user
and pass-phrase. Use GPG Keys for authenticating important
communications like important emails and such. You can alsy use Public
and Private encryption for additional security.

There are many good sites that detail securing SSH and using Keys.
Here's a few I have Bookmarked:

- https://help.ubuntu.com/community/SSH/OpenSSH/Keys
-
https://www.linode.com/docs/security/use-public-key-authentication-with-ssh

This is a good overview:
http://www.cyberciti.biz/faq/how-to-set-up-ssh-keys-on-linux-unix/

73's
Greg, KI7MT



On 9/13/2014 16:23, Jeff Francis™ jeff-CDdbmnNP9qodnm+***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] wrote:
>
>
> Do you need stand-along virus protection for Linux? I'd say no, but
> that's a qualified no. There most certainly is malware that attacks and
> infects linux. It's probably 1/10000th of the amount that's written for
> Windows or Android, but that doesn't mean it doesn't exist. On the
> other hand, it doesn't tend to propagate the way Windows viruses do.
> Linux malware is about 99% based on exploiting bugs in server software
> (like bind, apache, and tomcat). The other 1% is file attachments in
> PDFs, java, and that kind of thing. So it exists, but it tends to
> mainly target servers. The reality is that if you're not running a
> server on the open internet, you've probably got very little to worry
> about. And even if you do, the odds are still with you. I've run
> FreeBSD, Linux, Solaris, HP/UX, AIX, and SunOS servers for 20+ years,
> and I can count the number of times a machine was successfully hacked on
> one hand. That's not saying I'm the world's greatest sysadmin, it's
> just saying that I did some very basic security-related things (keep the
> systems patched, don't run services you don't need, and use good
> passwords) combined with the fact that attacks just aren't all that common.
>
> If you're going to leave ssh open to the open internet (which is quite
> common, so you can log into your home system remotely), do three things:
>
> 1. Move it off of the default port 22. Anything is better than the
> default port. I usually use 2222. It most certainly does not make you
> immune from attack, but it does weed out 99% of the "script kiddie"
> attacks, which are nothing more than the digital equivalent of rattling
> the front doorknob of every house on a street to see if any were left
> unlocked.
> 2. Use a good password. And by good, I don't mean "combines some
> letter, numbers, upper case, and punctuation and is eight characters
> long". By good, I mean long. Take four random words (non-English is
> ever better), string them together with no spaces, capitalize one or two
> of them, and add a number on the end. These days, attacks are all about
> length, not complexity. Google "rainbow tables" for more information.
> 3. Last, but not least, run something that detects repeated failed
> login requests and blocks that IP source address for a period of time.
> There are many. fail2ban is one. It's as simple as "sudo apt-get
> install fail2ban" and you're covered.
>
> None of this is necessary if you don't forward port tcp/22 from the
> Internet (which most people don't).
>
> Whatever you do, don't simply forward all ports from your Internet
> connection to your Linux box. Be selective. At most, you'll probably
> want tcp/22 and tcp/80 (for ssh and http). Better yet, if you need to
> get into your home machine remotely, run OpenVPN and forward nothing but
> udp/10000 (and run the OpenVPN server or udp/10000). Then you've got
> precisely one possible avenue of attack, and it's a pretty tough one.
>
> Personally, I also run a commercial firewall and IPS in front of my
> home network, but that's 'cause I'm ultra-paranoid from working in the
> computer security industry for so many years (plus I get the gear for
> free). Linux is actually reasonably secure all by itself. Not
> bulletproof, but probably two orders of magnitude more so than Windows
> or Android (the two cesspools of malware in the digital world).
>
> Jeff N0GQ
>
>
> On Fri, Sep 12, 2014 at 6:36 PM, Lloyd xr250-***@public.gmane.org
> <mailto:xr250-***@public.gmane.org> [linuxham] <linuxham-***@public.gmane.org
> <mailto:linuxham-***@public.gmane.org>> wrote:
>
> __
>
>
> I have wondered about this. As a new guy, are there certain sites I
> should stick to for a known good copy of Linux? Also, is it true
> that I don't need stand alone virus protection with Linux?
>
> On 9/12/2014 8:03 PM, Jeff KP3FT kp3ft-/***@public.gmane.org
> <mailto:kp3ft-/***@public.gmane.org> [linuxham] wrote:
>>
>> No. I'm rabidly anti-Microsoft, for many years. What I am
>> suggesting is simply starting over for the sake of practicality.
>> I've installed many Linux and other OS distros on many computers.
>> Occasionally the easiest fix is to simply start over. It takes
>> what, five, ten, twenty minutes to do it, depending? Linux is
>> free, and installation is relatively quick. Maybe there's bad
>> libs or bins from a corrupted or dirty ISO CD, or from trying
>> various fixes.
>>
>>
>> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
>> *From:* "Ed autek-***@public.gmane.org <mailto:autek-***@public.gmane.org>
>> [linuxham]" <linuxham-***@public.gmane.org>
>> <mailto:linuxham-***@public.gmane.org>
>> *To:* linuxham-***@public.gmane.org <mailto:linuxham-***@public.gmane.org>
>> *Sent:* Friday, September 12, 2014 8:25 PM
>> *Subject:* Re: [linuxham] FLDIGI on mint 17 won't open?
>>
>>
>> On 09/12/2014 08:15 PM, Jeff KP3FT kp3ft-/***@public.gmane.org
>> <mailto:kp3ft-/***@public.gmane.org> [linuxham] wrote:
>> > Might be easier to do as you suggested... start from a clean slate
>> > and reinstall Mint 17 on the same partition. Ater that, apply the
>> > first update (it should be a single one), then the next update which
>> > is around 297. Restart and try installing FLDigi again.
>>
>> Sounds like something a MS person would suggest.
>>
>> Ed W3NR
>>
>>
>
>
>
>
> --
> -=jeff=-
>
>

--
73's
Greg, KI7MT


------------------------------------
Posted by: KI7MT <ki7mt-/***@public.gmane.org>
------------------------------------
Ed autek-Wuw85uim5zDR7s880joybQ@public.gmane.org [linuxham]
2014-09-13 16:53:36 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On 09/13/2014 12:23 PM, Jeff Francis™ jeff-CDdbmnNP9qodnm+***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] wrote:
> Do you need stand-along virus protection for Linux? I'd say no, but
> that's a qualified no. There most certainly is malware that attacks and
> infects linux. It's probably 1/10000th of the amount that's written for
> Windows or Android, but that doesn't mean it doesn't exist. On the other
> hand, it doesn't tend to propagate the way Windows viruses do. Linux
> malware is about 99% based on exploiting bugs in server software (like
> bind, apache, and tomcat). The other 1% is file attachments in PDFs, java,
> and that kind of thing. So it exists, but it tends to mainly target
> servers. The reality is that if you're not running a server on the open
> internet, you've probably got very little to worry about. And even if you
> do, the odds are still with you. I've run FreeBSD, Linux, Solaris, HP/UX,
> AIX, and SunOS servers for 20+ years, and I can count the number of times a
> machine was successfully hacked on one hand. That's not saying I'm the
> world's greatest sysadmin, it's just saying that I did some very basic
> security-related things (keep the systems patched, don't run services you
> don't need, and use good passwords) combined with the fact that attacks
> just aren't all that common.
>
> If you're going to leave ssh open to the open internet (which is quite
> common, so you can log into your home system remotely), do three things:
>
> 1. Move it off of the default port 22. Anything is better than the
> default port. I usually use 2222. It most certainly does not make you
> immune from attack, but it does weed out 99% of the "script kiddie"
> attacks, which are nothing more than the digital equivalent of rattling the
> front doorknob of every house on a street to see if any were left unlocked.
> 2. Use a good password. And by good, I don't mean "combines some
> letter, numbers, upper case, and punctuation and is eight characters long".
> By good, I mean long. Take four random words (non-English is ever
> better), string them together with no spaces, capitalize one or two of
> them, and add a number on the end. These days, attacks are all about
> length, not complexity. Google "rainbow tables" for more information.
> 3. Last, but not least, run something that detects repeated failed login
> requests and blocks that IP source address for a period of time. There are
> many. fail2ban is one. It's as simple as "sudo apt-get install fail2ban"
> and you're covered.
>
> None of this is necessary if you don't forward port tcp/22 from the
> Internet (which most people don't).
>
> Whatever you do, don't simply forward all ports from your Internet
> connection to your Linux box. Be selective. At most, you'll probably want
> tcp/22 and tcp/80 (for ssh and http). Better yet, if you need to get into
> your home machine remotely, run OpenVPN and forward nothing but udp/10000
> (and run the OpenVPN server or udp/10000). Then you've got precisely one
> possible avenue of attack, and it's a pretty tough one.
>
> Personally, I also run a commercial firewall and IPS in front of my home
> network, but that's 'cause I'm ultra-paranoid from working in the computer
> security industry for so many years (plus I get the gear for free). Linux
> is actually reasonably secure all by itself. Not bulletproof, but probably
> two orders of magnitude more so than Windows or Android (the two cesspools
> of malware in the digital world).
>
> Jeff N0GQ

Excellent post and advice.

Ed W3NR











------------------------------------
Posted by: Ed <autek-***@public.gmane.org>
------------------------------------
Lloyd xr250-rphTv4pjVZMJGwgDXS7ZQA@public.gmane.org [linuxham]
2014-09-13 18:30:23 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Thanks for the excellent advice! I would not be running a server on the
internet. Rather, a dedicated point to point network as in HSSM-mesh
for hams.
On 9/13/2014 11:23 AM, Jeff Francis™ jeff-CDdbmnNP9qodnm+***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] wrote:
> Do you need stand-along virus protection for Linux? I'd say no, but
> that's a qualified no. There most certainly is malware that attacks
> and infects linux. It's probably 1/10000th of the amount that's
> written for Windows or Android, but that doesn't mean it doesn't
> exist. On the other hand, it doesn't tend to propagate the way
> Windows viruses do. Linux malware is about 99% based on exploiting
> bugs in server software (like bind, apache, and tomcat). The other 1%
> is file attachments in PDFs, java, and that kind of thing. So it
> exists, but it tends to mainly target servers. The reality is that if
> you're not running a server on the open internet, you've probably got
> very little to worry about. And even if you do, the odds are still
> with you. I've run FreeBSD, Linux, Solaris, HP/UX, AIX, and SunOS
> servers for 20+ years, and I can count the number of times a machine
> was successfully hacked on one hand. That's not saying I'm the
> world's greatest sysadmin, it's just saying that I did some very basic
> security-related things (keep the systems patched, don't run services
> you don't need, and use good passwords) combined with the fact that
> attacks just aren't all that common.
>
> If you're going to leave ssh open to the open internet (which is
> quite common, so you can log into your home system remotely), do three
> things:
>
> 1. Move it off of the default port 22. Anything is better than the
> default port. I usually use 2222. It most certainly does not make
> you immune from attack, but it does weed out 99% of the "script
> kiddie" attacks, which are nothing more than the digital equivalent of
> rattling the front doorknob of every house on a street to see if any
> were left unlocked.
> 2. Use a good password. And by good, I don't mean "combines some
> letter, numbers, upper case, and punctuation and is eight characters
> long". By good, I mean long. Take four random words (non-English is
> ever better), string them together with no spaces, capitalize one or
> two of them, and add a number on the end. These days, attacks are all
> about length, not complexity. Google "rainbow tables" for more
> information.
> 3. Last, but not least, run something that detects repeated failed
> login requests and blocks that IP source address for a period of time.
> There are many. fail2ban is one. It's as simple as "sudo apt-get
> install fail2ban" and you're covered.
>
> None of this is necessary if you don't forward port tcp/22 from the
> Internet (which most people don't).
>
> Whatever you do, don't simply forward all ports from your Internet
> connection to your Linux box. Be selective. At most, you'll probably
> want tcp/22 and tcp/80 (for ssh and http). Better yet, if you need to
> get into your home machine remotely, run OpenVPN and forward nothing
> but udp/10000 (and run the OpenVPN server or udp/10000). Then you've
> got precisely one possible avenue of attack, and it's a pretty tough one.
>
> Personally, I also run a commercial firewall and IPS in front of my
> home network, but that's 'cause I'm ultra-paranoid from working in the
> computer security industry for so many years (plus I get the gear for
> free). Linux is actually reasonably secure all by itself. Not
> bulletproof, but probably two orders of magnitude more so than Windows
> or Android (the two cesspools of malware in the digital world).
>
> Jeff N0GQ
>
>
> On Fri, Sep 12, 2014 at 6:36 PM, Lloyd xr250-***@public.gmane.org
> <mailto:xr250-***@public.gmane.org> [linuxham] <linuxham-***@public.gmane.org
> <mailto:linuxham-***@public.gmane.org>> wrote:
>
> I have wondered about this. As a new guy, are there certain sites
> I should stick to for a known good copy of Linux? Also, is it
> true that I don't need stand alone virus protection with Linux?
>
> On 9/12/2014 8:03 PM, Jeff KP3FT kp3ft-/***@public.gmane.org
> <mailto:kp3ft-/***@public.gmane.org> [linuxham] wrote:
>> No. I'm rabidly anti-Microsoft, for many years. What I am
>> suggesting is simply starting over for the sake of practicality.
>> I've installed many Linux and other OS distros on many
>> computers. Occasionally the easiest fix is to simply start
>> over. It takes what, five, ten, twenty minutes to do it,
>> depending? Linux is free, and installation is relatively quick.
>> Maybe there's bad libs or bins from a corrupted or dirty ISO CD,
>> or from trying various fixes.
>>
>>
>> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
>> *From:* "Ed autek-***@public.gmane.org <mailto:autek-***@public.gmane.org>
>> [linuxham]" <linuxham-***@public.gmane.org>
>> <mailto:linuxham-***@public.gmane.org>
>> *To:* linuxham-***@public.gmane.org <mailto:linuxham-***@public.gmane.org>
>> *Sent:* Friday, September 12, 2014 8:25 PM
>> *Subject:* Re: [linuxham] FLDIGI on mint 17 won't open?
>>
>> On 09/12/2014 08:15 PM, Jeff KP3FT kp3ft-/***@public.gmane.org
>> <mailto:kp3ft-/***@public.gmane.org> [linuxham] wrote:
>> > Might be easier to do as you suggested... start from a clean slate
>> > and reinstall Mint 17 on the same partition. Ater that, apply the
>> > first update (it should be a single one), then the next update
>> which
>> > is around 297. Restart and try installing FLDigi again.
>>
>> Sounds like something a MS person would suggest.
>>
>> Ed W3NR
>>
>>
>
>
>
>
> --
> -=jeff=-
>
'qrv-JH0e/pQ7GQk@public.gmane.org' qrv-JH0e/pQ7GQk@public.gmane.org [linuxham]
2014-09-13 19:03:38 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Is this what you're doing?

http://www.broadband-hamnet.org/

My son (also a Ham) and I did get a 2-router HSSM-Mesh setup working
but we were too far from a hub to connect with anyone else so we sold
them to a Ham in Atlanta.

Need idea & they recently released a new version of the OS for a
different series of routers with some neat possibilities.

David KD4E

> Lloyd xr250-***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] wrote:
>
>
> Thanks for the excellent advice! I would not be running a server on the
> internet. Rather, a dedicated point to point network as in HSSM-mesh
> for hams.

--

David Colburn, KD4E - Nevils, Georgia USA

Safe & Secure Search Engine: duckduckgo.com

Android for Hams: groups.yahoo.com/group/hamdroid
Creative Tech: groups.yahoo.com/group/ham-macguyver
Raspi Alternative: groups.yahoo.com/group/beagleboneblack/

Restored to design-spec at Heaven's gate 1Cor15:22


------------------------------------
Posted by: "qrv-JH0e/***@public.gmane.org" <qrv-JH0e/***@public.gmane.org>
------------------------------------
Lloyd xr250-rphTv4pjVZMJGwgDXS7ZQA@public.gmane.org [linuxham]
2014-09-13 19:32:14 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Yes. I'm using the firmware from the Austin ham group. As an example
of use, when covering a tree-at halon event, the Austin group is able to
send live video feed from a remote part of the race back to the starting
line. They get 50mb/s at line of site distances nearing 10 miles.
(Using dish antennas) This is in back country with no internet.

I would like to have it for email, file transfers, video, audio
conferencing, etc., during an emergency when internet and cell service
is down. It will only work between fellow hams with similar equipment,
but the idea is to make it a field deploy-able, stand alone network.
The routers already see each other, and I can log in to either router
from both computers. So they work, but you can't actually "do" anything.

Here is the problem: I'm a computer novice. I don't know what I need
to make one machine act as the server, with the other machines clients.
I need to learn about port forwarding, and advertising the service.
What I need is someone with network experience who can create a stand
alone network from scratch. Most people don't understand why I want to
"re-invent" the internet since it already exists.

Windows 7 is supposed to offer this kind of machine to machine
networking, but I couldn't get it to work. Now that I'm learning Linux,
I figure it is a natural for stand alone networking. I just have a lot
to learn!

On 9/13/2014 2:03 PM, 'qrv-JH0e/***@public.gmane.org' qrv-JH0e/***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] wrote:
>
> Is this what you're doing?
>
> http://www.broadband-hamnet.org/
>
> My son (also a Ham) and I did get a 2-router HSSM-Mesh setup working
> but we were too far from a hub to connect with anyone else so we sold
> them to a Ham in Atlanta.
>
> Need idea & they recently released a new version of the OS for a
> different series of routers with some neat possibilities.
>
> David KD4E
>
> > Lloyd xr250-***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] wrote:
> >
> >
> > Thanks for the excellent advice! I would not be running a server on the
> > internet. Rather, a dedicated point to point network as in HSSM-mesh
> > for hams.
>
> --
>
> David Colburn, KD4E - Nevils, Georgia USA
>
> Safe & Secure Search Engine: duckduckgo.com
>
> Android for Hams: groups.yahoo.com/group/hamdroid
> Creative Tech: groups.yahoo.com/group/ham-macguyver
> Raspi Alternative: groups.yahoo.com/group/beagleboneblack/
>
> Restored to design-spec at Heaven's gate 1Cor15:22
>
>
'qrv-JH0e/pQ7GQk@public.gmane.org' qrv-JH0e/pQ7GQk@public.gmane.org [linuxham]
2014-09-13 19:53:40 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
A non-proprietary/free OS that loads on commonly-available routers
& can auto-connect to others for an instant-network that's self-healing
and robust (e.g. 50mb/s) is a very useful tool.

Have you also considered that you can use the camera feed from a
quad-copter or other vehicle via the Broadband-Hamnet to share it?

The folks on the http://www.broadband-hamnet.org/ Forum used to be
very helpful back when I was experimenting with it - have you not
found that to be the case?

At least some of the Hams there were always excited about new
adopters and delighted to share what they have accomplished -
which includes the apps you listed.

They had a demo set-up at Dayton and I believe many of the other
larger Fests across the USA. I think they were at Stone Mountain
last year -- I believe it's Nov. 1 & 2 this year.

David KD4E

> Lloyd xr250-***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] wrote:
>
> Yes. I'm using the firmware from the Austin ham group. As an example
> of use, when covering a tree-at halon event, the Austin group is able to
> send live video feed from a remote part of the race back to the starting
> line. They get 50mb/s at line of site distances nearing 10 miles.
> (Using dish antennas) This is in back country with no internet.
>
> I would like to have it for email, file transfers, video, audio
> conferencing, etc., during an emergency when internet and cell service
> is down. It will only work between fellow hams with similar equipment,
> but the idea is to make it a field deploy-able, stand alone network.
> The routers already see each other, and I can log in to either router
> from both computers. So they work, but you can't actually "do" anything.
>
> Here is the problem: I'm a computer novice. I don't know what I need
> to make one machine act as the server, with the other machines clients.
> I need to learn about port forwarding, and advertising the service.
> What I need is someone with network experience who can create a stand
> alone network from scratch. Most people don't understand why I want to
> "re-invent" the internet since it already exists.
>
> Windows 7 is supposed to offer this kind of machine to machine
> networking, but I couldn't get it to work. Now that I'm learning Linux,
> I figure it is a natural for stand alone networking. I just have a lot
> to learn!



--

David Colburn, KD4E - Nevils, Georgia USA

Safe & Secure Search Engine: duckduckgo.com

Android for Hams: groups.yahoo.com/group/hamdroid
Creative Tech: groups.yahoo.com/group/ham-macguyver
Raspi Alternative: groups.yahoo.com/group/beagleboneblack/

Restored to design-spec at Heaven's gate 1Cor15:22


------------------------------------
Posted by: "qrv-JH0e/***@public.gmane.org" <qrv-JH0e/***@public.gmane.org>
------------------------------------
Lloyd xr250-rphTv4pjVZMJGwgDXS7ZQA@public.gmane.org [linuxham]
2014-09-13 20:04:18 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Yes, that is the idea. Live video feed and other high data rate uses
would be great. And, although recreating the internet from scratch
would be alot of work!!; the good news is we don't need any consumer
frills and silly stuff. Just simple access between machines.

Unfortunately, I have to say the Austin folks are great at giving away
freeware to hack the routers, but they refuse to help in the networking
aspect. This probably means it is harder to do than I'd like. If you
read their forums, there are countless questions from people regarding
how to actually USE the stuff. If you search the internet, you'll find
4+ hour long conferences on how to flash the routers and you still don't
learn how to implement a network. They will even tell you that if you
don't know how to make it work, then that is your problem.

Actually, I bet one of you could build a Linux system that one could
download and have the functionality required. It is probably a money
making opportunity. Of course, if there isn't enough demand, it may not
be practical for the time you invest.

On 9/13/2014 2:53 PM, 'qrv-JH0e/***@public.gmane.org' qrv-JH0e/***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] wrote:
>
> A non-proprietary/free OS that loads on commonly-available routers
> & can auto-connect to others for an instant-network that's self-healing
> and robust (e.g. 50mb/s) is a very useful tool.
>
> Have you also considered that you can use the camera feed from a
> quad-copter or other vehicle via the Broadband-Hamnet to share it?
>
> The folks on the http://www.broadband-hamnet.org/ Forum used to be
> very helpful back when I was experimenting with it - have you not
> found that to be the case?
>
> At least some of the Hams there were always excited about new
> adopters and delighted to share what they have accomplished -
> which includes the apps you listed.
>
> They had a demo set-up at Dayton and I believe many of the other
> larger Fests across the USA. I think they were at Stone Mountain
> last year -- I believe it's Nov. 1 & 2 this year.
>
> David KD4E
>
> > Lloyd xr250-***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] wrote:
> >
> > Yes. I'm using the firmware from the Austin ham group. As an example
> > of use, when covering a tree-at halon event, the Austin group is able to
> > send live video feed from a remote part of the race back to the starting
> > line. They get 50mb/s at line of site distances nearing 10 miles.
> > (Using dish antennas) This is in back country with no internet.
> >
> > I would like to have it for email, file transfers, video, audio
> > conferencing, etc., during an emergency when internet and cell service
> > is down. It will only work between fellow hams with similar equipment,
> > but the idea is to make it a field deploy-able, stand alone network.
> > The routers already see each other, and I can log in to either router
> > from both computers. So they work, but you can't actually "do" anything.
> >
> > Here is the problem: I'm a computer novice. I don't know what I need
> > to make one machine act as the server, with the other machines clients.
> > I need to learn about port forwarding, and advertising the service.
> > What I need is someone with network experience who can create a stand
> > alone network from scratch. Most people don't understand why I want to
> > "re-invent" the internet since it already exists.
> >
> > Windows 7 is supposed to offer this kind of machine to machine
> > networking, but I couldn't get it to work. Now that I'm learning Linux,
> > I figure it is a natural for stand alone networking. I just have a lot
> > to learn!
>
> --
>
> David Colburn, KD4E - Nevils, Georgia USA
>
> Safe & Secure Search Engine: duckduckgo.com
>
> Android for Hams: groups.yahoo.com/group/hamdroid
> Creative Tech: groups.yahoo.com/group/ham-macguyver
> Raspi Alternative: groups.yahoo.com/group/beagleboneblack/
>
> Restored to design-spec at Heaven's gate 1Cor15:22
>
>
Matthew Pitts daywalker_blade_2004-/E1597aS9LQAvxtiuMwx3w@public.gmane.org [linuxham]
2014-09-13 20:28:58 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Lloyd,

I found this set of examples right on the Broadband-Hamnet site: http://www.broadband-hamnet.org/applications-for-the-mesh.html

I'm sure there is enough information there for an enterprising ham to figure out how to get other applications to work over a mesh network.

Matthew Pitts
N8OHU





________________________________
From: "Lloyd xr250-***@public.gmane.org [linuxham]" <linuxham-***@public.gmane.org>
To: linuxham-***@public.gmane.org
Sent: Saturday, September 13, 2014 4:04 PM
Subject: Re: [linuxham] Re: HSSM-Mesh/Broadband-Hamnet [Was: FLDIGI on mint 17 won't open?]




Yes, that is the idea. Live video feed and other high data rate uses would be great. And, although recreating the internet from scratch would be alot of work!!; the good news is we don't need any consumer frills and silly stuff. Just simple access between machines.

Unfortunately, I have to say the Austin folks are great at giving
away freeware to hack the routers, but they refuse to help in the
networking aspect. This probably means it is harder to do than I'd
like. If you read their forums, there are countless questions from
people regarding how to actually USE the stuff. If you search the
internet, you'll find 4+ hour long conferences on how to flash the
routers and you still don't learn how to implement a network. They
will even tell you that if you don't know how to make it work, then
that is your problem.

Actually, I bet one of you could build a Linux system that one could
download and have the functionality required. It is probably a
money making opportunity. Of course, if there isn't enough demand,
it may not be practical for the time you invest.


On 9/13/2014 2:53 PM, 'qrv-JH0e/***@public.gmane.org' qrv-JH0e/***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] wrote:


>A non-proprietary/free OS that loads on commonly-available routers
>& can auto-connect to others for an instant-network
that's self-healing
>and robust (e.g. 50mb/s) is a very useful tool.
>
>Have you also considered that you can use the camera feed
from a
>quad-copter or other vehicle via the Broadband-Hamnet to
share it?
>
>The folks on the http://www.broadband-hamnet.org/ Forum used to be
>very helpful back when I was experimenting with it - have
you not
>found that to be the case?
>
>At least some of the Hams there were always excited about
new
>adopters and delighted to share what they have
accomplished -
>which includes the apps you listed.
>
>They had a demo set-up at Dayton and I believe many of the
other
>larger Fests across the USA. I think they were at Stone
Mountain
>last year -- I believe it's Nov. 1 & 2 this year.
>
>David KD4E
>
>> Lloyd xr250-***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] wrote:
>>
>> Yes. I'm using the firmware from the Austin ham
group. As an example
>> of use, when covering a tree-at halon event, the
Austin group is able to
>> send live video feed from a remote part of the race
back to the starting
>> line. They get 50mb/s at line of site distances
nearing 10 miles.
>> (Using dish antennas) This is in back country with no
internet.
>>
>> I would like to have it for email, file transfers,
video, audio
>> conferencing, etc., during an emergency when internet
and cell service
>> is down. It will only work between fellow hams with
similar equipment,
>> but the idea is to make it a field deploy-able, stand
alone network.
>> The routers already see each other, and I can log in
to either router
>> from both computers. So they work, but you can't
actually "do" anything.
>>
>> Here is the problem: I'm a computer novice. I don't
know what I need
>> to make one machine act as the server, with the other
machines clients.
>> I need to learn about port forwarding, and
advertising the service.
>> What I need is someone with network experience who
can create a stand
>> alone network from scratch. Most people don't
understand why I want to
>> "re-invent" the internet since it already exists.
>>
>> Windows 7 is supposed to offer this kind of machine
to machine
>> networking, but I couldn't get it to work. Now that
I'm learning Linux,
>> I figure it is a natural for stand alone networking.
I just have a lot
>> to learn!
>
>--
>
>David Colburn, KD4E - Nevils, Georgia USA
>
>Safe & Secure Search Engine: duckduckgo.com
>
>Android for Hams: groups.yahoo.com/group/hamdroid
>Creative Tech: groups.yahoo.com/group/ham-macguyver
>Raspi Alternative: groups.yahoo.com/group/beagleboneblack/
>
>Restored to design-spec at Heaven's gate 1Cor15:22
>
'qrv-JH0e/pQ7GQk@public.gmane.org' qrv-JH0e/pQ7GQk@public.gmane.org [linuxham]
2014-09-13 20:38:45 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Have you seen these?

https://sites.google.com/site/ecsmesh/
(Youtube that introduces it http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T8Rw0ZfRN-U )

Others:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GGtwVxZ4Mto

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xpMr1VVUbQQ

Adding a Webserver:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tr5EiK4W994

Adding an analog telephone:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DeSKlyrofbo

HTH ... David KD4E


> Yes, that is the idea. Live video feed and other high data rate uses
> would be great. And, although recreating the internet from scratch
> would be alot of work!!; the good news is we don't need any consumer
> frills and silly stuff. Just simple access between machines.
>
> Unfortunately, I have to say the Austin folks are great at giving away
> freeware to hack the routers, but they refuse to help in the networking
> aspect. This probably means it is harder to do than I'd like. If you
> read their forums, there are countless questions from people regarding
> how to actually USE the stuff. If you search the internet, you'll find
> 4+ hour long conferences on how to flash the routers and you still don't
> learn how to implement a network. They will even tell you that if you
> don't know how to make it work, then that is your problem.
>
> Actually, I bet one of you could build a Linux system that one could
> download and have the functionality required. It is probably a money
> making opportunity. Of course, if there isn't enough demand, it may not
> be practical for the time you invest.


--

David Colburn, KD4E - Nevils, Georgia USA

Safe & Secure Search Engine: duckduckgo.com

Android for Hams: groups.yahoo.com/group/hamdroid
Creative Tech: groups.yahoo.com/group/ham-macguyver
Raspi Alternative: groups.yahoo.com/group/beagleboneblack/

Restored to design-spec at Heaven's gate 1Cor15:22


------------------------------------
Posted by: "qrv-JH0e/***@public.gmane.org" <qrv-JH0e/***@public.gmane.org>
------------------------------------
Lloyd xr250-rphTv4pjVZMJGwgDXS7ZQA@public.gmane.org [linuxham]
2014-09-14 00:35:07 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
I have seen those. The best one is the guy who uses a consumer grade
server and hooks it up. I almost bought one, until I read on the Austin
forum that they don't always work, compatibility issues or something.
For those of us who are not computer experts, it really isn't ready for
prime time.

Then I wondered about "Apache". Maybe it can work as a file server?
Maybe I really need a set of servers. One each for email, file
transfer, video streaming? I really don't even know what I need to ask
the right questions! That's why I put it on the shelf until I can find
an interested network guy. Honestly it might be a bunch of headaches
getting it to work.

On 9/13/2014 3:38 PM, 'qrv-JH0e/***@public.gmane.org' qrv-JH0e/***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] wrote:
>
> Have you seen these?
>
> https://sites.google.com/site/ecsmesh/
> (Youtube that introduces it http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T8Rw0ZfRN-U )
>
> Others:
>
> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GGtwVxZ4Mto
>
> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xpMr1VVUbQQ
>
> Adding a Webserver:
> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tr5EiK4W994
>
> Adding an analog telephone:
> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DeSKlyrofbo
>
> HTH ... David KD4E
>
> > Yes, that is the idea. Live video feed and other high data rate uses
> > would be great. And, although recreating the internet from scratch
> > would be alot of work!!; the good news is we don't need any consumer
> > frills and silly stuff. Just simple access between machines.
> >
> > Unfortunately, I have to say the Austin folks are great at giving away
> > freeware to hack the routers, but they refuse to help in the networking
> > aspect. This probably means it is harder to do than I'd like. If you
> > read their forums, there are countless questions from people regarding
> > how to actually USE the stuff. If you search the internet, you'll find
> > 4+ hour long conferences on how to flash the routers and you still don't
> > learn how to implement a network. They will even tell you that if you
> > don't know how to make it work, then that is your problem.
> >
> > Actually, I bet one of you could build a Linux system that one could
> > download and have the functionality required. It is probably a money
> > making opportunity. Of course, if there isn't enough demand, it may not
> > be practical for the time you invest.
>
> --
>
> David Colburn, KD4E - Nevils, Georgia USA
>
> Safe & Secure Search Engine: duckduckgo.com
>
> Android for Hams: groups.yahoo.com/group/hamdroid
> Creative Tech: groups.yahoo.com/group/ham-macguyver
> Raspi Alternative: groups.yahoo.com/group/beagleboneblack/
>
> Restored to design-spec at Heaven's gate 1Cor15:22
>
>
Larry Levesque ka1vgm-Re5JQEeQqe8AvxtiuMwx3w@public.gmane.org [linuxham]
2014-09-14 12:13:39 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
This mesh network is just that, a network.

If you want to add services (web server, voip server, database, email,
IM, printers, etc) you have to add those to the network yourself.
You can also provide a link to the Internet.
And this is why people frown upon answering as you introduce advertising
into the mix via just about every website you go to .
And of course that breaks the FCC rules.

So, creating the mesh network is easy and the main use for it is to
allow computers over an area to be able to communicate to each other easily.

It is the services that you set up that add functionality.
It is not designed as a way to easily get on the Internet there are
plenty of commercially available solutions for that.

It is designed with a network engineer (or at least someone with a
fairly good amount of networking experience) in mind.
You have to be able to plan out how/where the services enter the mesh
and how they are advertised.

I have recently gathered the parts to make a simple mesh myself and will
be working on this over the next year or so.
I do have the knowledge to make it work, just not the time right now.

I live outside of Keene, NH up on a hill with a view of downtown Keene
from the top of my tower.
I want to create a mesh in the Keene area so local hams can connect and
have a high speed network independent of the Internet.

I just need to find a location in Keene I can "see" from my tower to
host another node in the mesh to make it useful.

On 09/13/2014 08:35 PM, Lloyd xr250-***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] wrote:
>
> I have seen those. The best one is the guy who uses a consumer grade
> server and hooks it up. I almost bought one, until I read on the
> Austin forum that they don't always work, compatibility issues or
> something. For those of us who are not computer experts, it really
> isn't ready for prime time.
>
> Then I wondered about "Apache". Maybe it can work as a file server?
> Maybe I really need a set of servers. One each for email, file
> transfer, video streaming? I really don't even know what I need to
> ask the right questions! That's why I put it on the shelf until I can
> find an interested network guy. Honestly it might be a bunch of
> headaches getting it to work.
>
> On 9/13/2014 3:38 PM, 'qrv-JH0e/***@public.gmane.org' qrv-JH0e/***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] wrote:
>>
>> Have you seen these?
>>
>> https://sites.google.com/site/ecsmesh/
>> (Youtube that introduces it http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T8Rw0ZfRN-U )
>>
>> Others:
>>
>> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GGtwVxZ4Mto
>>
>> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xpMr1VVUbQQ
>>
>> Adding a Webserver:
>> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tr5EiK4W994
>>
>> Adding an analog telephone:
>> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DeSKlyrofbo
>>
>> HTH ... David KD4E
>>
>> > Yes, that is the idea. Live video feed and other high data rate uses
>> > would be great. And, although recreating the internet from scratch
>> > would be alot of work!!; the good news is we don't need any consumer
>> > frills and silly stuff. Just simple access between machines.
>> >
>> > Unfortunately, I have to say the Austin folks are great at giving away
>> > freeware to hack the routers, but they refuse to help in the networking
>> > aspect. This probably means it is harder to do than I'd like. If you
>> > read their forums, there are countless questions from people regarding
>> > how to actually USE the stuff. If you search the internet, you'll find
>> > 4+ hour long conferences on how to flash the routers and you still
>> don't
>> > learn how to implement a network. They will even tell you that if you
>> > don't know how to make it work, then that is your problem.
>> >
>> > Actually, I bet one of you could build a Linux system that one could
>> > download and have the functionality required. It is probably a money
>> > making opportunity. Of course, if there isn't enough demand, it may not
>> > be practical for the time you invest.
>>
>> --
>>
>> David Colburn, KD4E - Nevils, Georgia USA
>>
>> Safe & Secure Search Engine: duckduckgo.com
>>
>> Android for Hams: groups.yahoo.com/group/hamdroid
>> Creative Tech: groups.yahoo.com/group/ham-macguyver
>> Raspi Alternative: groups.yahoo.com/group/beagleboneblack/
>>
>> Restored to design-spec at Heaven's gate 1Cor15:22
>>
>
>

--
*KA1VGM
Larry Levesque*
Jeff Francis™ jeff-CDdbmnNP9qodnm+yROfE0A@public.gmane.org [linuxham]
2014-09-13 20:42:47 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
I haven't been on the forum you're talking about, but I'm going to go out
on a limb and hazard a guess as to why you're seeing what you're seeing.

Networking is a discipline, for lack of a better word. Ultimately, it's
an art/science of moving packets from one place to another that's largely
independent of the underlying technology. From a networking perspective, a
TCP packet moving from New York to London doesn't care if it's moving over
a transatlantic cable, a satellite, a microwave link, WiFi/HSSM, a packet
radio link, or via carrier pigeon. Networking involves understanding
things like TCP, UDP, BGP4, IPv6, Spanning Tree, OSPF, and that kind of
thing.

Clients and servers are a whole separate skillset. It involves
networking, certainly, but also heavily focuses on software and
interoperability of software. It involves understanding the applications
as well as the operating systems they run on. It involves understanding
how to bind services to ports, how to configure services to run
automatically, how to fail over, how to set up DNS and proxies, and a
million other things.

Finally, there's the HSMM guys. They're focused on a new way to provided
the lowest-level connectivity for the networking piece of this. A way of
connecting network nodes via high-power WiFi. They're heavily into
understanding, configuring, and documenting the lowest level (Layer 1) of
the networking stack.

Given this, it's little surprise that they have little time or interest
in helping people with the first two items. By the time you get to the
point where you're doing things like designing HSMM networkings, it's
assumed that you've already mastered networking, servers, and software.
It's actually not surprising that they don't respond much to this, as the
assumption is that if you're deploying what they're building, you'll
already know how to run things on top of it.

Here's a good analogy. A rich guy decides he wants to race cars. So he
buys a $1m race car and has it hauled to the track on practice day. He
rolls it down off the trailer and wanders over to the other drivers and
mechanics who welcome him, and he asks for a bit of help. But see, he's
never actually driven a car before...

The rich guy isn't dumb, he's just jumping into the deep end with the
wrong crowd on Day 1. Learn to operate a car. Then learn to drive in
traffic. Then get some miles under your belt. Then try racing go-karts to
learn how racing works. Then learn to drive a high-performance car. Then,
maybe, it's time to go race. But starting out with racing when you've
never driven a car before is a recipe for disaster.

Likewise, setting up a network for events is a solvable problem. But the
HSSM stuff really isn't your problem. Learn networking first. Not
everything there is to know, but learn about addressing, routing, subnets,
broadcast addresses. The basics. Then understand the problem you're
trying to solve at the event. Find (or write) software that solves that
problem. Then learn how to set it all up and get it to run reliably on a
wired network. If it won't run right on a wired network, believe me,
you're not going to be happy over wireless. Master getting your software
to do what you want and when. Now that you understand your software and
the networking required for the pieces to talk to each other, it's time to
look at moving it off the wired network to the HSSM network, and all the
new problems associated with flaky connections. Of course, you don't have
to do all of this yourself. Break it up. One guy learns networking. The
next guy learns servers. Third guy learns the software. And the four guy
learns HSSM. Put them all together, and you've got a solution.

You'll find hams (and non-hams) happy to help with every piece of this.
But if you don't get the fundamentals down before trying the esoteric
stuff, you're going to end up very frustrated.

Jeff N0GQ



On Sat, Sep 13, 2014 at 1:04 PM, Lloyd xr250-***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] <
linuxham-***@public.gmane.org> wrote:

>
>
> Yes, that is the idea. Live video feed and other high data rate uses
> would be great. And, although recreating the internet from scratch would
> be alot of work!!; the good news is we don't need any consumer frills and
> silly stuff. Just simple access between machines.
>
> Unfortunately, I have to say the Austin folks are great at giving away
> freeware to hack the routers, but they refuse to help in the networking
> aspect. This probably means it is harder to do than I'd like. If you read
> their forums, there are countless questions from people regarding how to
> actually USE the stuff. If you search the internet, you'll find 4+ hour
> long conferences on how to flash the routers and you still don't learn how
> to implement a network. They will even tell you that if you don't know how
> to make it work, then that is your problem.
>
> Actually, I bet one of you could build a Linux system that one could
> download and have the functionality required. It is probably a money
> making opportunity. Of course, if there isn't enough demand, it may not be
> practical for the time you invest.
>
>
> On 9/13/2014 2:53 PM, 'qrv-JH0e/***@public.gmane.org' qrv-JH0e/***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] wrote:
>
>
>
> A non-proprietary/free OS that loads on commonly-available routers
> & can auto-connect to others for an instant-network that's self-healing
> and robust (e.g. 50mb/s) is a very useful tool.
>
> Have you also considered that you can use the camera feed from a
> quad-copter or other vehicle via the Broadband-Hamnet to share it?
>
> The folks on the http://www.broadband-hamnet.org/ Forum used to be
> very helpful back when I was experimenting with it - have you not
> found that to be the case?
>
> At least some of the Hams there were always excited about new
> adopters and delighted to share what they have accomplished -
> which includes the apps you listed.
>
> They had a demo set-up at Dayton and I believe many of the other
> larger Fests across the USA. I think they were at Stone Mountain
> last year -- I believe it's Nov. 1 & 2 this year.
>
> David KD4E
>
> > Lloyd xr250-***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] wrote:
> >
> > Yes. I'm using the firmware from the Austin ham group. As an example
> > of use, when covering a tree-at halon event, the Austin group is able to
> > send live video feed from a remote part of the race back to the starting
> > line. They get 50mb/s at line of site distances nearing 10 miles.
> > (Using dish antennas) This is in back country with no internet.
> >
> > I would like to have it for email, file transfers, video, audio
> > conferencing, etc., during an emergency when internet and cell service
> > is down. It will only work between fellow hams with similar equipment,
> > but the idea is to make it a field deploy-able, stand alone network.
> > The routers already see each other, and I can log in to either router
> > from both computers. So they work, but you can't actually "do" anything.
> >
> > Here is the problem: I'm a computer novice. I don't know what I need
> > to make one machine act as the server, with the other machines clients.
> > I need to learn about port forwarding, and advertising the service.
> > What I need is someone with network experience who can create a stand
> > alone network from scratch. Most people don't understand why I want to
> > "re-invent" the internet since it already exists.
> >
> > Windows 7 is supposed to offer this kind of machine to machine
> > networking, but I couldn't get it to work. Now that I'm learning Linux,
> > I figure it is a natural for stand alone networking. I just have a lot
> > to learn!
>
> --
>
> David Colburn, KD4E - Nevils, Georgia USA
>
> Safe & Secure Search Engine: duckduckgo.com
>
> Android for Hams: groups.yahoo.com/group/hamdroid
> Creative Tech: groups.yahoo.com/group/ham-macguyver
> Raspi Alternative: groups.yahoo.com/group/beagleboneblack/
>
> Restored to design-spec at Heaven's gate 1Cor15:22
>
>
>
>



--
-=jeff=-
Lloyd xr250-rphTv4pjVZMJGwgDXS7ZQA@public.gmane.org [linuxham]
2014-09-14 00:31:08 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Yes, I've seen those. They are great examples of what can be done.
However, the hardware part is easy. What is lacking are the software
details required to make it actually work. If you follow those listed
examples, many people reference them in their forum asking the same
questions I am.

Probably, the solution is something simple especially for a professional
network person. The issue is you are trying to make different consumer
devices, camera, etc. work without an pre-existing internet. For
example, if you buy an IP camera, it is fairly simple to set it up and
log into it's address via the internet. But the internet is doing all
the work for you for free. Same thing as a "cloud" storage, etc.
However, when you are creating your own stand alone network. You can
not simply plug a bunch of devices into a router and have things work.
Some how, you have to have a server which I guess "hosts" the device and
directs the proper port forwarding and advertises the device so that it
can be accessed by "clients". I think that is right?


On 9/13/2014 3:28 PM, Matthew Pitts daywalker_blade_2004-/***@public.gmane.org
[linuxham] wrote:
> Lloyd,
>
> I found this set of examples right on the Broadband-Hamnet site:
> http://www.broadband-hamnet.org/applications-for-the-mesh.html
>
> I'm sure there is enough information there for an enterprising ham to
> figure out how to get other applications to work over a mesh network.
>
> Matthew Pitts
> N8OHU
>
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
> *From:* "Lloyd xr250-***@public.gmane.org [linuxham]" <linuxham-***@public.gmane.org>
> *To:* linuxham-***@public.gmane.org
> *Sent:* Saturday, September 13, 2014 4:04 PM
> *Subject:* Re: [linuxham] Re: HSSM-Mesh/Broadband-Hamnet [Was: FLDIGI
> on mint 17 won't open?]
>
> Yes, that is the idea. Live video feed and other high data rate uses
> would be great. And, although recreating the internet from scratch
> would be alot of work!!; the good news is we don't need any consumer
> frills and silly stuff. Just simple access between machines.
>
> Unfortunately, I have to say the Austin folks are great at giving away
> freeware to hack the routers, but they refuse to help in the
> networking aspect. This probably means it is harder to do than I'd
> like. If you read their forums, there are countless questions from
> people regarding how to actually USE the stuff. If you search the
> internet, you'll find 4+ hour long conferences on how to flash the
> routers and you still don't learn how to implement a network. They
> will even tell you that if you don't know how to make it work, then
> that is your problem.
>
> Actually, I bet one of you could build a Linux system that one could
> download and have the functionality required. It is probably a money
> making opportunity. Of course, if there isn't enough demand, it may
> not be practical for the time you invest.
>
> On 9/13/2014 2:53 PM, 'qrv-JH0e/***@public.gmane.org <mailto:qrv-JH0e/***@public.gmane.org>'
> qrv-JH0e/***@public.gmane.org <mailto:qrv-JH0e/***@public.gmane.org> [linuxham] wrote:
>> A non-proprietary/free OS that loads on commonly-available routers
>> & can auto-connect to others for an instant-network that's self-healing
>> and robust (e.g. 50mb/s) is a very useful tool.
>>
>> Have you also considered that you can use the camera feed from a
>> quad-copter or other vehicle via the Broadband-Hamnet to share it?
>>
>> The folks on the http://www.broadband-hamnet.org/ Forum used to be
>> very helpful back when I was experimenting with it - have you not
>> found that to be the case?
>>
>> At least some of the Hams there were always excited about new
>> adopters and delighted to share what they have accomplished -
>> which includes the apps you listed.
>>
>> They had a demo set-up at Dayton and I believe many of the other
>> larger Fests across the USA. I think they were at Stone Mountain
>> last year -- I believe it's Nov. 1 & 2 this year.
>>
>> David KD4E
>>
>> > Lloyd xr250-***@public.gmane.org <mailto:xr250-***@public.gmane.org> [linuxham]
>> wrote:
>> >
>> > Yes. I'm using the firmware from the Austin ham group. As an example
>> > of use, when covering a tree-at halon event, the Austin group is
>> able to
>> > send live video feed from a remote part of the race back to the
>> starting
>> > line. They get 50mb/s at line of site distances nearing 10 miles.
>> > (Using dish antennas) This is in back country with no internet.
>> >
>> > I would like to have it for email, file transfers, video, audio
>> > conferencing, etc., during an emergency when internet and cell service
>> > is down. It will only work between fellow hams with similar equipment,
>> > but the idea is to make it a field deploy-able, stand alone network.
>> > The routers already see each other, and I can log in to either router
>> > from both computers. So they work, but you can't actually "do"
>> anything.
>> >
>> > Here is the problem: I'm a computer novice. I don't know what I need
>> > to make one machine act as the server, with the other machines
>> clients.
>> > I need to learn about port forwarding, and advertising the service.
>> > What I need is someone with network experience who can create a stand
>> > alone network from scratch. Most people don't understand why I want to
>> > "re-invent" the internet since it already exists.
>> >
>> > Windows 7 is supposed to offer this kind of machine to machine
>> > networking, but I couldn't get it to work. Now that I'm learning Linux,
>> > I figure it is a natural for stand alone networking. I just have a lot
>> > to learn!
>>
>> --
>>
>> David Colburn, KD4E - Nevils, Georgia USA
>>
>> Safe & Secure Search Engine: duckduckgo.com
>>
>> Android for Hams: groups.yahoo.com/group/hamdroid
>> Creative Tech: groups.yahoo.com/group/ham-macguyver
>> Raspi Alternative: groups.yahoo.com/group/beagleboneblack/
>>
>> Restored to design-spec at Heaven's gate 1Cor15:22
>
>
>
>
Lloyd xr250-rphTv4pjVZMJGwgDXS7ZQA@public.gmane.org [linuxham]
2014-09-14 17:42:20 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Yes, you are exactly right. I have no local interest, so I'm really
trying to do it all myself. I think without years of professional
training and experience, it may not be practical to go it alone.


On 9/13/2014 3:42 PM, Jeff Francis™ jeff-CDdbmnNP9qodnm+***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] wrote:
> I haven't been on the forum you're talking about, but I'm going to
> go out on a limb and hazard a guess as to why you're seeing what
> you're seeing.
>
> Networking is a discipline, for lack of a better word. Ultimately,
> it's an art/science of moving packets from one place to another that's
> largely independent of the underlying technology. From a networking
> perspective, a TCP packet moving from New York to London doesn't care
> if it's moving over a transatlantic cable, a satellite, a microwave
> link, WiFi/HSSM, a packet radio link, or via carrier pigeon.
> Networking involves understanding things like TCP, UDP, BGP4, IPv6,
> Spanning Tree, OSPF, and that kind of thing.
>
> Clients and servers are a whole separate skillset. It involves
> networking, certainly, but also heavily focuses on software and
> interoperability of software. It involves understanding the
> applications as well as the operating systems they run on. It
> involves understanding how to bind services to ports, how to configure
> services to run automatically, how to fail over, how to set up DNS and
> proxies, and a million other things.
>
> Finally, there's the HSMM guys. They're focused on a new way to
> provided the lowest-level connectivity for the networking piece of
> this. A way of connecting network nodes via high-power WiFi. They're
> heavily into understanding, configuring, and documenting the lowest
> level (Layer 1) of the networking stack.
>
> Given this, it's little surprise that they have little time or
> interest in helping people with the first two items. By the time you
> get to the point where you're doing things like designing HSMM
> networkings, it's assumed that you've already mastered networking,
> servers, and software. It's actually not surprising that they don't
> respond much to this, as the assumption is that if you're deploying
> what they're building, you'll already know how to run things on top of it.
>
> Here's a good analogy. A rich guy decides he wants to race cars.
> So he buys a $1m race car and has it hauled to the track on practice
> day. He rolls it down off the trailer and wanders over to the other
> drivers and mechanics who welcome him, and he asks for a bit of help.
> But see, he's never actually driven a car before...
>
> The rich guy isn't dumb, he's just jumping into the deep end with
> the wrong crowd on Day 1. Learn to operate a car. Then learn to
> drive in traffic. Then get some miles under your belt. Then try
> racing go-karts to learn how racing works. Then learn to drive a
> high-performance car. Then, maybe, it's time to go race. But
> starting out with racing when you've never driven a car before is a
> recipe for disaster.
>
> Likewise, setting up a network for events is a solvable problem.
> But the HSSM stuff really isn't your problem. Learn networking
> first. Not everything there is to know, but learn about addressing,
> routing, subnets, broadcast addresses. The basics. Then understand
> the problem you're trying to solve at the event. Find (or write)
> software that solves that problem. Then learn how to set it all up
> and get it to run reliably on a wired network. If it won't run right
> on a wired network, believe me, you're not going to be happy over
> wireless. Master getting your software to do what you want and when.
> Now that you understand your software and the networking required for
> the pieces to talk to each other, it's time to look at moving it off
> the wired network to the HSSM network, and all the new problems
> associated with flaky connections. Of course, you don't have to do
> all of this yourself. Break it up. One guy learns networking. The
> next guy learns servers. Third guy learns the software. And the four
> guy learns HSSM. Put them all together, and you've got a solution.
>
> You'll find hams (and non-hams) happy to help with every piece of
> this. But if you don't get the fundamentals down before trying the
> esoteric stuff, you're going to end up very frustrated.
>
> Jeff N0GQ
>
>
>
> On Sat, Sep 13, 2014 at 1:04 PM, Lloyd xr250-***@public.gmane.org
> <mailto:xr250-***@public.gmane.org> [linuxham] <linuxham-***@public.gmane.org
> <mailto:linuxham-***@public.gmane.org>> wrote:
>
> Yes, that is the idea. Live video feed and other high data rate
> uses would be great. And, although recreating the internet from
> scratch would be alot of work!!; the good news is we don't need
> any consumer frills and silly stuff. Just simple access between
> machines.
>
> Unfortunately, I have to say the Austin folks are great at giving
> away freeware to hack the routers, but they refuse to help in the
> networking aspect. This probably means it is harder to do than
> I'd like. If you read their forums, there are countless questions
> from people regarding how to actually USE the stuff. If you
> search the internet, you'll find 4+ hour long conferences on how
> to flash the routers and you still don't learn how to implement a
> network. They will even tell you that if you don't know how to
> make it work, then that is your problem.
>
> Actually, I bet one of you could build a Linux system that one
> could download and have the functionality required. It is
> probably a money making opportunity. Of course, if there isn't
> enough demand, it may not be practical for the time you invest.
>
>
>
> On 9/13/2014 2:53 PM, 'qrv-JH0e/***@public.gmane.org <mailto:qrv-JH0e/***@public.gmane.org>'
> qrv-JH0e/***@public.gmane.org <mailto:qrv-JH0e/***@public.gmane.org> [linuxham] wrote:
>>
>> A non-proprietary/free OS that loads on commonly-available routers
>> & can auto-connect to others for an instant-network that's
>> self-healing
>> and robust (e.g. 50mb/s) is a very useful tool.
>>
>> Have you also considered that you can use the camera feed from a
>> quad-copter or other vehicle via the Broadband-Hamnet to share it?
>>
>> The folks on the http://www.broadband-hamnet.org/ Forum used to be
>> very helpful back when I was experimenting with it - have you not
>> found that to be the case?
>>
>> At least some of the Hams there were always excited about new
>> adopters and delighted to share what they have accomplished -
>> which includes the apps you listed.
>>
>> They had a demo set-up at Dayton and I believe many of the other
>> larger Fests across the USA. I think they were at Stone Mountain
>> last year -- I believe it's Nov. 1 & 2 this year.
>>
>> David KD4E
>>
>> > Lloyd xr250-***@public.gmane.org <mailto:xr250-***@public.gmane.org>
>> [linuxham] wrote:
>> >
>> > Yes. I'm using the firmware from the Austin ham group. As an
>> example
>> > of use, when covering a tree-at halon event, the Austin group
>> is able to
>> > send live video feed from a remote part of the race back to the
>> starting
>> > line. They get 50mb/s at line of site distances nearing 10 miles.
>> > (Using dish antennas) This is in back country with no internet.
>> >
>> > I would like to have it for email, file transfers, video, audio
>> > conferencing, etc., during an emergency when internet and cell
>> service
>> > is down. It will only work between fellow hams with similar
>> equipment,
>> > but the idea is to make it a field deploy-able, stand alone
>> network.
>> > The routers already see each other, and I can log in to either
>> router
>> > from both computers. So they work, but you can't actually "do"
>> anything.
>> >
>> > Here is the problem: I'm a computer novice. I don't know what I
>> need
>> > to make one machine act as the server, with the other machines
>> clients.
>> > I need to learn about port forwarding, and advertising the
>> service.
>> > What I need is someone with network experience who can create a
>> stand
>> > alone network from scratch. Most people don't understand why I
>> want to
>> > "re-invent" the internet since it already exists.
>> >
>> > Windows 7 is supposed to offer this kind of machine to machine
>> > networking, but I couldn't get it to work. Now that I'm
>> learning Linux,
>> > I figure it is a natural for stand alone networking. I just
>> have a lot
>> > to learn!
>>
>> --
>>
>> David Colburn, KD4E - Nevils, Georgia USA
>>
>> Safe & Secure Search Engine: duckduckgo.com <http://duckduckgo.com>
>>
>> Android for Hams: groups.yahoo.com/group/hamdroid
>> <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/hamdroid>
>> Creative Tech: groups.yahoo.com/group/ham-macguyver
>> <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/ham-macguyver>
>> Raspi Alternative: groups.yahoo.com/group/beagleboneblack/
>> <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/beagleboneblack/>
>>
>> Restored to design-spec at Heaven's gate 1Cor15:22
>>
>
>
>
>
> --
> -=jeff=-
>
Jeff Francis™ jeff-CDdbmnNP9qodnm+yROfE0A@public.gmane.org [linuxham]
2014-09-15 19:59:58 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
By no means do I want to discourage experimentation. Not in the
slightest. I'm just suggesting why you're maybe not getting much traction
from the wireless guys (because I see it all the time, in many different
areas, not just ham radio).

What you're proposing seems like a good start. Access files across a
network. Start simple. Put two boxes with whatever OS you choose on a
stand-alone wired network. Two boxes plugged into a $5 garage sale
ethernet switch. Make them talk. Figure out how to do IP addressing and
get them to exchange packets. Maybe step up to setting up a DHCP server on
the network so you don't have to hard-code addresses. Then work on moving
files back and forth. There are a million ways to do that, none of them
wrong (at least not for learning). Add a camera and figure out how to
stream video from one device to another. Then convert the wired network to
wifi. There's a who new slew of problems (and benefits) to swapping out
the underlying network. Yes, in theory, it's not supposed to matter. In
reality, it does. You'll drop more packets on wireless, for example. How
do your applications react to that? Are there speed differences? Do the
apps start sending garbage or crash? They shouldn't, but sometimes they
do. Then try switching from wifi to the long-range ham wireless. More
benefits, more headaches. But get things working reliably and predictably
at each step along the way before you add a new layer of complexity. Never
change more than one thing at a time. That way, when new problems show up,
it's easier to track them down and figure out what happened and why.

None of these steps are things you can't do on your own with a little
help from Google and/or helpful people on the 'net. Each is a well-defined
problem with tried-and-true solutions. Work through them one at a time,
and a few months down the road, you'll have wireless HD video streaming
across your ham network.

Jeff N0GQ


On Sun, Sep 14, 2014 at 10:42 AM, Lloyd xr250-***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] <
linuxham-***@public.gmane.org> wrote:

>
>
> Yes, you are exactly right. I have no local interest, so I'm really
> trying to do it all myself. I think without years of professional training
> and experience, it may not be practical to go it alone.
>
>
> On 9/13/2014 3:42 PM, Jeff Francis™ jeff-CDdbmnNP9qodnm+***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] wrote:
>
>
> I haven't been on the forum you're talking about, but I'm going to go
> out on a limb and hazard a guess as to why you're seeing what you're
> seeing.
>
> Networking is a discipline, for lack of a better word. Ultimately,
> it's an art/science of moving packets from one place to another that's
> largely independent of the underlying technology. From a networking
> perspective, a TCP packet moving from New York to London doesn't care if
> it's moving over a transatlantic cable, a satellite, a microwave link,
> WiFi/HSSM, a packet radio link, or via carrier pigeon. Networking involves
> understanding things like TCP, UDP, BGP4, IPv6, Spanning Tree, OSPF, and
> that kind of thing.
>
> Clients and servers are a whole separate skillset. It involves
> networking, certainly, but also heavily focuses on software and
> interoperability of software. It involves understanding the applications
> as well as the operating systems they run on. It involves understanding
> how to bind services to ports, how to configure services to run
> automatically, how to fail over, how to set up DNS and proxies, and a
> million other things.
>
> Finally, there's the HSMM guys. They're focused on a new way to
> provided the lowest-level connectivity for the networking piece of this. A
> way of connecting network nodes via high-power WiFi. They're heavily into
> understanding, configuring, and documenting the lowest level (Layer 1) of
> the networking stack.
>
> Given this, it's little surprise that they have little time or
> interest in helping people with the first two items. By the time you get
> to the point where you're doing things like designing HSMM networkings,
> it's assumed that you've already mastered networking, servers, and
> software. It's actually not surprising that they don't respond much to
> this, as the assumption is that if you're deploying what they're building,
> you'll already know how to run things on top of it.
>
> Here's a good analogy. A rich guy decides he wants to race cars. So
> he buys a $1m race car and has it hauled to the track on practice day. He
> rolls it down off the trailer and wanders over to the other drivers and
> mechanics who welcome him, and he asks for a bit of help. But see, he's
> never actually driven a car before...
>
> The rich guy isn't dumb, he's just jumping into the deep end with the
> wrong crowd on Day 1. Learn to operate a car. Then learn to drive in
> traffic. Then get some miles under your belt. Then try racing go-karts to
> learn how racing works. Then learn to drive a high-performance car. Then,
> maybe, it's time to go race. But starting out with racing when you've
> never driven a car before is a recipe for disaster.
>
> Likewise, setting up a network for events is a solvable problem. But
> the HSSM stuff really isn't your problem. Learn networking first. Not
> everything there is to know, but learn about addressing, routing, subnets,
> broadcast addresses. The basics. Then understand the problem you're
> trying to solve at the event. Find (or write) software that solves that
> problem. Then learn how to set it all up and get it to run reliably on a
> wired network. If it won't run right on a wired network, believe me,
> you're not going to be happy over wireless. Master getting your software
> to do what you want and when. Now that you understand your software and
> the networking required for the pieces to talk to each other, it's time to
> look at moving it off the wired network to the HSSM network, and all the
> new problems associated with flaky connections. Of course, you don't have
> to do all of this yourself. Break it up. One guy learns networking. The
> next guy learns servers. Third guy learns the software. And the four guy
> learns HSSM. Put them all together, and you've got a solution.
>
> You'll find hams (and non-hams) happy to help with every piece of
> this. But if you don't get the fundamentals down before trying the
> esoteric stuff, you're going to end up very frustrated.
>
> Jeff N0GQ
>
>
>
> On Sat, Sep 13, 2014 at 1:04 PM, Lloyd xr250-***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] <
> linuxham-***@public.gmane.org> wrote:
>
>>
>>
>> Yes, that is the idea. Live video feed and other high data rate uses
>> would be great. And, although recreating the internet from scratch would
>> be alot of work!!; the good news is we don't need any consumer frills and
>> silly stuff. Just simple access between machines.
>>
>> Unfortunately, I have to say the Austin folks are great at giving away
>> freeware to hack the routers, but they refuse to help in the networking
>> aspect. This probably means it is harder to do than I'd like. If you read
>> their forums, there are countless questions from people regarding how to
>> actually USE the stuff. If you search the internet, you'll find 4+ hour
>> long conferences on how to flash the routers and you still don't learn how
>> to implement a network. They will even tell you that if you don't know how
>> to make it work, then that is your problem.
>>
>> Actually, I bet one of you could build a Linux system that one could
>> download and have the functionality required. It is probably a money
>> making opportunity. Of course, if there isn't enough demand, it may not be
>> practical for the time you invest.
>>
>>
>> On 9/13/2014 2:53 PM, 'qrv-JH0e/***@public.gmane.org' qrv-JH0e/***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] wrote:
>>
>>
>>
>> A non-proprietary/free OS that loads on commonly-available routers
>> & can auto-connect to others for an instant-network that's self-healing
>> and robust (e.g. 50mb/s) is a very useful tool.
>>
>> Have you also considered that you can use the camera feed from a
>> quad-copter or other vehicle via the Broadband-Hamnet to share it?
>>
>> The folks on the http://www.broadband-hamnet.org/ Forum used to be
>> very helpful back when I was experimenting with it - have you not
>> found that to be the case?
>>
>> At least some of the Hams there were always excited about new
>> adopters and delighted to share what they have accomplished -
>> which includes the apps you listed.
>>
>> They had a demo set-up at Dayton and I believe many of the other
>> larger Fests across the USA. I think they were at Stone Mountain
>> last year -- I believe it's Nov. 1 & 2 this year.
>>
>> David KD4E
>>
>> > Lloyd xr250-***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] wrote:
>> >
>> > Yes. I'm using the firmware from the Austin ham group. As an example
>> > of use, when covering a tree-at halon event, the Austin group is able to
>> > send live video feed from a remote part of the race back to the starting
>> > line. They get 50mb/s at line of site distances nearing 10 miles.
>> > (Using dish antennas) This is in back country with no internet.
>> >
>> > I would like to have it for email, file transfers, video, audio
>> > conferencing, etc., during an emergency when internet and cell service
>> > is down. It will only work between fellow hams with similar equipment,
>> > but the idea is to make it a field deploy-able, stand alone network.
>> > The routers already see each other, and I can log in to either router
>> > from both computers. So they work, but you can't actually "do" anything.
>> >
>> > Here is the problem: I'm a computer novice. I don't know what I need
>> > to make one machine act as the server, with the other machines clients.
>> > I need to learn about port forwarding, and advertising the service.
>> > What I need is someone with network experience who can create a stand
>> > alone network from scratch. Most people don't understand why I want to
>> > "re-invent" the internet since it already exists.
>> >
>> > Windows 7 is supposed to offer this kind of machine to machine
>> > networking, but I couldn't get it to work. Now that I'm learning Linux,
>> > I figure it is a natural for stand alone networking. I just have a lot
>> > to learn!
>>
>> --
>>
>> David Colburn, KD4E - Nevils, Georgia USA
>>
>> Safe & Secure Search Engine: duckduckgo.com
>>
>> Android for Hams: groups.yahoo.com/group/hamdroid
>> Creative Tech: groups.yahoo.com/group/ham-macguyver
>> Raspi Alternative: groups.yahoo.com/group/beagleboneblack/
>>
>> Restored to design-spec at Heaven's gate 1Cor15:22
>>
>>
>>
>
>
> --
> -=jeff=-
>
>
>
>



--
-=jeff=-
mm0fmf mm0fmf-PkbjNfxxIARBDgjK7y7TUQ@public.gmane.org [linuxham]
2014-09-15 21:10:17 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On 15/09/2014 20:59, Jeff Francis™ jeff-CDdbmnNP9qodnm+***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] wrote:
> By no means do I want to discourage experimentation. Not in the
> slightest. I'm just suggesting why you're maybe not getting much
> traction from the wireless guys (because I see it all the time, in many
> different areas, not just ham radio).
>

[SNIP]

What he said!

Play with some wired networks first and learn the basics. Then move to
ordinary consumer wireless. Then to special ham-wireless. It's so much
easier to understand why the complex stuff will not work if you
understand the fundamentals and how it should work.

Andy
MM0FMF



------------------------------------
Posted by: mm0fmf <mm0fmf-***@public.gmane.org>
------------------------------------
David Ranch linuxham-fld-U76wwbNhhF3R7s880joybQ@public.gmane.org [linuxham]
2014-09-14 16:32:33 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Hello Lloyd,

> Here is the problem: I'm a computer novice. I don't know what I need
> to make one machine act as the server, with the other machines
> clients. I need to learn about port forwarding, and advertising the
> service. What I need is someone with network experience who can
> create a stand alone network from scratch. Most people don't
> understand why I want to "re-invent" the internet since it already
> exists.
>
> Windows 7 is supposed to offer this kind of machine to machine
> networking, but I couldn't get it to work. Now that I'm learning
> Linux, I figure it is a natural for stand alone networking. I just
> have a lot to learn!

There are lots of ways to approach what you're looking for but if you're
looking for a simple to deploy and use IM chat, file client/server, and
mapping program, there is one program many people skip over but is
perfect for simple needs: D-Rats

http://www.d-rats.com/

Though originally intended for D-star, it also works via the Internet,
private TCP/IP networks (Mesh), AX.25 packet radio (supports all those
transports at the same time), and has built-in Winlink support as well.
All of that functionality in D-Rats runs multi-platform for Linux, OSX,
Windows, etc. in a nice GUI via Python. Now, if you want to do things
via a classic Linux / Internet service by service method (SMTP servers,
IMAP servers, DNS servers, FTP servers, etc), that's completely possible
as well. Lots of good learning to be found in that approach but it will
take some time to learn. I previously wrote a large doc about how to do
this on Linux step by step and I can give you some URLs if you (or
anyone else) is interested.

--David
KI6ZHD
Lloyd xr250-rphTv4pjVZMJGwgDXS7ZQA@public.gmane.org [linuxham]
2014-09-14 17:34:37 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
David,
I would love to read your doc that you made. I have to start learning
somewhere. I may be asking to much to get this done with my lack of
experience. Not knowing any better, my thought is to start with just
the two routers I have, and build a very simple file server that would
allow accessing files on the server's hard drive from the client. I
would think something like Apache does this? As I don't have any local
interest from any hams in my area, this may be all I ever need. No
consumer oriented frills, just a stand alone network that I can set up
in the field, point to point. This way, you keep it simple and
physically limit the number of users on the network. Being so austere,
I can start slow and learn while not really having security issues. I'd
use an old computer with nothing serious on it. Or perhaps a raspberry
pi which does nothing other than a live video feed. I envision high
definition video from multiple feeds. This would make use of the very
high speed connection at a price point that is much better than old
school ATV stuff.

Due to FCC regulations and content control, I don't imagine ever having
any internet access, except maybe a provision for emergencies. Seems
safer that way to me.

I'll have to look at D-rats.

On 9/14/2014 11:32 AM, David Ranch linuxham-fld-***@public.gmane.org [linuxham]
wrote:
>
>
> Hello Lloyd,
>
>> Here is the problem: I'm a computer novice. I don't know what I
>> need to make one machine act as the server, with the other machines
>> clients. I need to learn about port forwarding, and advertising the
>> service. What I need is someone with network experience who can
>> create a stand alone network from scratch. Most people don't
>> understand why I want to "re-invent" the internet since it already
>> exists.
>>
>> Windows 7 is supposed to offer this kind of machine to machine
>> networking, but I couldn't get it to work. Now that I'm learning
>> Linux, I figure it is a natural for stand alone networking. I just
>> have a lot to learn!
>
> There are lots of ways to approach what you're looking for but if
> you're looking for a simple to deploy and use IM chat, file
> client/server, and mapping program, there is one program many people
> skip over but is perfect for simple needs: D-Rats
>
> http://www.d-rats.com/
>
> Though originally intended for D-star, it also works via the Internet,
> private TCP/IP networks (Mesh), AX.25 packet radio (supports all those
> transports at the same time), and has built-in Winlink support as
> well. All of that functionality in D-Rats runs multi-platform for
> Linux, OSX, Windows, etc. in a nice GUI via Python. Now, if you want
> to do things via a classic Linux / Internet service by service method
> (SMTP servers, IMAP servers, DNS servers, FTP servers, etc), that's
> completely possible as well. Lots of good learning to be found in
> that approach but it will take some time to learn. I previously wrote
> a large doc about how to do this on Linux step by step and I can give
> you some URLs if you (or anyone else) is interested.
>
> --David
> KI6ZHD
>
>
Ernest Wagner aa1ad-WYrOkVUspZo@public.gmane.org [linuxham]
2014-09-15 03:04:07 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Samba installed on Linux might be a good way to start: it can serve
files to both Linux and Windows systems, and act as a Windows interface
to a printer using CUPS.


--
73 From Ernie D

AA1AD | CN87ug

-----Original Message-----
From: Lloyd xr250-***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] <linuxham-***@public.gmane.org>
Reply-to: linuxham-***@public.gmane.org
To: linuxham-***@public.gmane.org
Subject: Re: [linuxham] Re: HSSM-Mesh/Broadband-Hamnet [Was: FLDIGI on
mint 17 won't open?]
Date: Sun, 14 Sep 2014 12:34:37 -0500


David,
I would love to read your doc that you made. I have to start learning
somewhere. I may be asking to much to get this done with my lack of
experience. Not knowing any better, my thought is to start with just
the two routers I have, and build a very simple file server that would
allow accessing files on the server's hard drive from the client. I
would think something like Apache does this? As I don't have any local
interest from any hams in my area, this may be all I ever need. No
consumer oriented frills, just a stand alone network that I can set up
in the field, point to point. This way, you keep it simple and
physically limit the number of users on the network. Being so austere,
I can start slow and learn while not really having security issues. I'd
use an old computer with nothing serious on it. Or perhaps a raspberry
pi which does nothing other than a live video feed. I envision high
definition video from multiple feeds. This would make use of the very
high speed connection at a price point that is much better than old
school ATV stuff.

Due to FCC regulations and content control, I don't imagine ever having
any internet access, except maybe a provision for emergencies. Seems
safer that way to me.

I'll have to look at D-rats.



On 9/14/2014 11:32 AM, David Ranch linuxham-fld-***@public.gmane.org [linuxham]
wrote:

>
>
> Hello Lloyd,
>
>
>
> > Here is the problem: I'm a computer novice. I don't know what I
> > need to make one machine act as the server, with the other machines
> > clients. I need to learn about port forwarding, and advertising the
> > service. What I need is someone with network experience who can
> > create a stand alone network from scratch. Most people don't
> > understand why I want to "re-invent" the internet since it already
> > exists.
> >
> > Windows 7 is supposed to offer this kind of machine to machine
> > networking, but I couldn't get it to work. Now that I'm learning
> > Linux, I figure it is a natural for stand alone networking. I just
> > have a lot to learn!
>
> There are lots of ways to approach what you're looking for but if
> you're looking for a simple to deploy and use IM chat, file
> client/server, and mapping program, there is one program many people
> skip over but is perfect for simple needs: D-Rats
>
> http://www.d-rats.com/
>
> Though originally intended for D-star, it also works via the Internet,
> private TCP/IP networks (Mesh), AX.25 packet radio (supports all those
> transports at the same time), and has built-in Winlink support as
> well. All of that functionality in D-Rats runs multi-platform for
> Linux, OSX, Windows, etc. in a nice GUI via Python. Now, if you want
> to do things via a classic Linux / Internet service by service method
> (SMTP servers, IMAP servers, DNS servers, FTP servers, etc), that's
> completely possible as well. Lots of good learning to be found in
> that approach but it will take some time to learn. I previously wrote
> a large doc about how to do this on Linux step by step and I can give
> you some URLs if you (or anyone else) is interested.
>
> --David
> KI6ZHD
>
>








------------------------------------
Posted by: Ernest Wagner <wagnered-***@public.gmane.org>
------------------------------------
David Ranch linuxham-fld-U76wwbNhhF3R7s880joybQ@public.gmane.org [linuxham]
2014-09-24 03:59:59 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Hello Lloyd,

I never received your original email though I did see the response to it
from Ernest. Anyway..

>I would love to read your doc that you made. I have to start learning
>somewhere.

You can find it here:

http://www.trinityos.com/LINUX/index-linux.html#trinityos


>Not knowing any better, my thought is to start with just
>the two routers I have, and build a very simple file server that would
>allow accessing files on the server's hard drive from the client. I
>would think something like Apache does this?

Basic Apache can let people download stuff but the basic service it won't allow uploads.
You can add additional modules like WebDAV, etc. but I wouldn't call that optimal.


>I can start slow and learn while not really having security issues. I'd
>use an old computer with nothing serious on it. Or perhaps a raspberry
>pi which does nothing other than a live video feed.

A Rpi is a great way to start with Linux and can do a *lot* of stuff.


>I envision high
>definition video from multiple feeds. This would make use of the very
>high speed connection at a price point that is much better than old
>school ATV stuff.

Sure.. that works and a Rpi can do that though if you want to start transcoding stuff,
you'll need a lot more CPU power.


> I'll have to look at D-rats.

I'll be curious what you think of it!

--David
KI6ZHD




> Samba installed on Linux might be a good way to start: it can serve
> files to both Linux and Windows systems, and act as a Windows interface
> to a printer using CUPS.
>
>



------------------------------------
Posted by: David Ranch <linuxham-fld-***@public.gmane.org>
------------------------------------
Lloyd xr250-rphTv4pjVZMJGwgDXS7ZQA@public.gmane.org [linuxham]
2014-09-26 01:12:02 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Thanks! You have some great info there.
On 09/23/2014 10:59 PM, David Ranch linuxham-fld-***@public.gmane.org [linuxham]
wrote:
>
>
> Hello Lloyd,
>
> I never received your original email though I did see the response to it
> from Ernest. Anyway..
>
> >I would love to read your doc that you made. I have to start learning
> >somewhere.
>
> You can find it here:
>
> http://www.trinityos.com/LINUX/index-linux.html#trinityos
>
> >Not knowing any better, my thought is to start with just
> >the two routers I have, and build a very simple file server that would
> >allow accessing files on the server's hard drive from the client. I
> >would think something like Apache does this?
>
> Basic Apache can let people download stuff but the basic service it
> won't allow uploads.
> You can add additional modules like WebDAV, etc. but I wouldn't call
> that optimal.
>
> >I can start slow and learn while not really having security issues. I'd
> >use an old computer with nothing serious on it. Or perhaps a raspberry
> >pi which does nothing other than a live video feed.
>
> A Rpi is a great way to start with Linux and can do a *lot* of stuff.
>
> >I envision high
> >definition video from multiple feeds. This would make use of the very
> >high speed connection at a price point that is much better than old
> >school ATV stuff.
>
> Sure.. that works and a Rpi can do that though if you want to start
> transcoding stuff,
> you'll need a lot more CPU power.
>
> > I'll have to look at D-rats.
>
> I'll be curious what you think of it!
>
> --David
> KI6ZHD
>
> > Samba installed on Linux might be a good way to start: it can serve
> > files to both Linux and Windows systems, and act as a Windows interface
> > to a printer using CUPS.
> >
> >
>
>
Jeff Francis™ jeff-CDdbmnNP9qodnm+yROfE0A@public.gmane.org [linuxham]
2014-09-13 20:16:39 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
It still might not be a bad idea to luck things down a bit. HSSM-mesh
for hams is just as easily used by non-hams. Anybody can download the HSSM
firmware and stick it on their device and access your network. I'm not
saying to be as paranoid as you would on the open Internet, but also keep
in mind that non-hams can and do access resources meant only for hams, so
at least use good passwords and turn off services that you don't need.
Those are two very easy fixes that only take a few minutes. sysv-rc-conf
is your friend.

Jeff N0GQ


On Sat, Sep 13, 2014 at 11:30 AM, Lloyd xr250-***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] <
linuxham-***@public.gmane.org> wrote:

>
>
> Thanks for the excellent advice! I would not be running a server on the
> internet. Rather, a dedicated point to point network as in HSSM-mesh for
> hams.
> On 9/13/2014 11:23 AM, Jeff Francis™ jeff-CDdbmnNP9qodnm+***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] wrote:
>
>
> Do you need stand-along virus protection for Linux? I'd say no, but
> that's a qualified no. There most certainly is malware that attacks and
> infects linux. It's probably 1/10000th of the amount that's written for
> Windows or Android, but that doesn't mean it doesn't exist. On the other
> hand, it doesn't tend to propagate the way Windows viruses do. Linux
> malware is about 99% based on exploiting bugs in server software (like
> bind, apache, and tomcat). The other 1% is file attachments in PDFs, java,
> and that kind of thing. So it exists, but it tends to mainly target
> servers. The reality is that if you're not running a server on the open
> internet, you've probably got very little to worry about. And even if you
> do, the odds are still with you. I've run FreeBSD, Linux, Solaris, HP/UX,
> AIX, and SunOS servers for 20+ years, and I can count the number of times a
> machine was successfully hacked on one hand. That's not saying I'm the
> world's greatest sysadmin, it's just saying that I did some very basic
> security-related things (keep the systems patched, don't run services you
> don't need, and use good passwords) combined with the fact that attacks
> just aren't all that common.
>
> If you're going to leave ssh open to the open internet (which is quite
> common, so you can log into your home system remotely), do three things:
>
> 1. Move it off of the default port 22. Anything is better than the
> default port. I usually use 2222. It most certainly does not make you
> immune from attack, but it does weed out 99% of the "script kiddie"
> attacks, which are nothing more than the digital equivalent of rattling the
> front doorknob of every house on a street to see if any were left unlocked.
> 2. Use a good password. And by good, I don't mean "combines some
> letter, numbers, upper case, and punctuation and is eight characters long".
> By good, I mean long. Take four random words (non-English is ever
> better), string them together with no spaces, capitalize one or two of
> them, and add a number on the end. These days, attacks are all about
> length, not complexity. Google "rainbow tables" for more information.
> 3. Last, but not least, run something that detects repeated failed
> login requests and blocks that IP source address for a period of time.
> There are many. fail2ban is one. It's as simple as "sudo apt-get install
> fail2ban" and you're covered.
>
> None of this is necessary if you don't forward port tcp/22 from the
> Internet (which most people don't).
>
> Whatever you do, don't simply forward all ports from your Internet
> connection to your Linux box. Be selective. At most, you'll probably want
> tcp/22 and tcp/80 (for ssh and http). Better yet, if you need to get into
> your home machine remotely, run OpenVPN and forward nothing but udp/10000
> (and run the OpenVPN server or udp/10000). Then you've got precisely one
> possible avenue of attack, and it's a pretty tough one.
>
> Personally, I also run a commercial firewall and IPS in front of my
> home network, but that's 'cause I'm ultra-paranoid from working in the
> computer security industry for so many years (plus I get the gear for
> free). Linux is actually reasonably secure all by itself. Not
> bulletproof, but probably two orders of magnitude more so than Windows or
> Android (the two cesspools of malware in the digital world).
>
> Jeff N0GQ
>
>
> On Fri, Sep 12, 2014 at 6:36 PM, Lloyd xr250-***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] <
> linuxham-***@public.gmane.org> wrote:
>
>>
>>
>> I have wondered about this. As a new guy, are there certain sites I
>> should stick to for a known good copy of Linux? Also, is it true that I
>> don't need stand alone virus protection with Linux?
>> On 9/12/2014 8:03 PM, Jeff KP3FT kp3ft-/***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] wrote:
>>
>>
>> No. I'm rabidly anti-Microsoft, for many years. What I am suggesting
>> is simply starting over for the sake of practicality. I've installed many
>> Linux and other OS distros on many computers. Occasionally the easiest fix
>> is to simply start over. It takes what, five, ten, twenty minutes to do
>> it, depending? Linux is free, and installation is relatively quick. Maybe
>> there's bad libs or bins from a corrupted or dirty ISO CD, or from trying
>> various fixes.
>>
>>
>> ------------------------------
>> *From:* "Ed autek-***@public.gmane.org [linuxham]" <linuxham-***@public.gmane.org>
>> <linuxham-***@public.gmane.org>
>> *To:* linuxham-***@public.gmane.org
>> *Sent:* Friday, September 12, 2014 8:25 PM
>> *Subject:* Re: [linuxham] FLDIGI on mint 17 won't open?
>>
>>
>> On 09/12/2014 08:15 PM, Jeff KP3FT kp3ft-/***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] wrote:
>> > Might be easier to do as you suggested... start from a clean slate
>> > and reinstall Mint 17 on the same partition. Ater that, apply the
>> > first update (it should be a single one), then the next update which
>> > is around 297. Restart and try installing FLDigi again.
>>
>> Sounds like something a MS person would suggest.
>>
>> Ed W3NR
>>
>>
>>
>>
>
>
> --
> -=jeff=-
>
>
>
>



--
-=jeff=-
Lloyd xr250-rphTv4pjVZMJGwgDXS7ZQA@public.gmane.org [linuxham]
2014-09-12 23:57:21 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
I did this: "sudo apt-get install libportaudio2" It says "libportaudio2
is already the newest version." Zero changes needed or made. Yet it
still says it's missing when I try to execute. Maybe the file is there
but in the wrong location?

Sorry I'm so green at this! I'm thinking that if the one click install
works via the software manager, then I can't see how I could have
screwed that up. Plus a subsequent reinstall from the terminal doesn't
work either. Seems like I have a fundamental problem with Mint? May
not be fixable with a new guy behind the wheel...

On 9/12/2014 6:30 PM, Jeff Francis™ jeff-CDdbmnNP9qodnm+***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] wrote:
> I do, actually. He told us:
>
> "What I did before was search for FLDIGI under the software manager,
> and did the one click install for FLDIGI."
>
> He's missing a dependency. Specifically, he's
> missing libportaudio2. Doing a re-install using apt is the easiest
> way to correct that for a new user. It will automatically calculate
> what's missing and install it for you. Yes, you could also do "sudo
> apt-get install libportaudio2". Or do it from a GUI.
>
> The interesting question is how fldigi got installed in the first
> place without the dependencies, but my assumption is that he'd rather
> get it working than debug what went wrong in the installation.
>
> If you have a different way, by all means, please offer it up, but
> just because it might be different is no excuse to refer to perfectly
> valid assistance as "guessing".
>
> Jeff N0GQ
>
>
>
> On Fri, Sep 12, 2014 at 4:20 PM, Ed autek-***@public.gmane.org
> <mailto:autek-***@public.gmane.org> [linuxham] <linuxham-***@public.gmane.org
> <mailto:linuxham-***@public.gmane.org>> wrote:
>
> On 09/12/2014 07:15 PM, Jeff Francis™ jeff-CDdbmnNP9qodnm+***@public.gmane.org
> <mailto:jeff-CDdbmnNP9qodnm+***@public.gmane.org> [linuxham] wrote:
> > That's odd, the installer should have taken care of the
> dependencies for
> > you. Try opening a shell and running:
> >
> > sudo apt-get install --reinstall fldigi
> >
> > If it somehow got installed without the correct libraries
> (though you
> > shouldn't be able to do that), this should fix it.
> >
> > Jeff N0GQ
>
> Please quit guessing. Do you know how he insatlled fldigi ??
>
> Ed W3NR
>
>
>
>
> --
> -=jeff=-
>
Jeff Francis™ jeff-CDdbmnNP9qodnm+yROfE0A@public.gmane.org [linuxham]
2014-09-13 00:01:31 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Don't worry, there's a lot to know about linux (though this isn't a
normal problem, and it should have worked fine the way you did it). You
can always trying the Windows trick of rebooting, though that's a lot less
common fix in the linux world. It does work sometimes, though. Normally,
just doing an install from the install GUI takes care of all the details
behind the scenes, and you just run your program and enjoy. This is
unusual.



On Fri, Sep 12, 2014 at 4:57 PM, Lloyd xr250-***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] <
linuxham-***@public.gmane.org> wrote:

>
>
> I did this: "sudo apt-get install libportaudio2" It says "libportaudio2
> is already the newest version." Zero changes needed or made. Yet it still
> says it's missing when I try to execute. Maybe the file is there but in
> the wrong location?
>
> Sorry I'm so green at this! I'm thinking that if the one click install
> works via the software manager, then I can't see how I could have screwed
> that up. Plus a subsequent reinstall from the terminal doesn't work
> either. Seems like I have a fundamental problem with Mint? May not be
> fixable with a new guy behind the wheel...
>
> On 9/12/2014 6:30 PM, Jeff Francis™ jeff-CDdbmnNP9qodnm+***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] wrote:
>
>
> I do, actually. He told us:
>
> "What I did before was search for FLDIGI under the software manager,
> and did the one click install for FLDIGI."
>
> He's missing a dependency. Specifically, he's missing libportaudio2.
> Doing a re-install using apt is the easiest way to correct that for a new
> user. It will automatically calculate what's missing and install it for
> you. Yes, you could also do "sudo apt-get install libportaudio2". Or do
> it from a GUI.
>
> The interesting question is how fldigi got installed in the first
> place without the dependencies, but my assumption is that he'd rather get
> it working than debug what went wrong in the installation.
>
> If you have a different way, by all means, please offer it up, but
> just because it might be different is no excuse to refer to perfectly valid
> assistance as "guessing".
>
> Jeff N0GQ
>
>
>
> On Fri, Sep 12, 2014 at 4:20 PM, Ed autek-***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] <
> linuxham-***@public.gmane.org> wrote:
>
>>
>>
>> On 09/12/2014 07:15 PM, Jeff Francis™ jeff-CDdbmnNP9qodnm+***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] wrote:
>> > That's odd, the installer should have taken care of the dependencies for
>> > you. Try opening a shell and running:
>> >
>> > sudo apt-get install --reinstall fldigi
>> >
>> > If it somehow got installed without the correct libraries (though you
>> > shouldn't be able to do that), this should fix it.
>> >
>> > Jeff N0GQ
>>
>> Please quit guessing. Do you know how he insatlled fldigi ??
>>
>> Ed W3NR
>>
>>
>
>
> --
> -=jeff=-
>
>
>
>



--
-=jeff=-
Lloyd xr250-rphTv4pjVZMJGwgDXS7ZQA@public.gmane.org [linuxham]
2014-09-13 00:28:58 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Thanks for saying that. I have been really impressed with Mint so far.
Much better than windows in all aspects and the GUI interface is very
intuitive. And I learned on DOS years ago, so I'm not scared of the
terminal. It is interesting though that a one click install should be
hard for me to screw up.
You can tell I'm a windows user! Let's face it, when the registry and
dll's get screwed up, its just easier for people like me to wipe it out
and reinstall windows! I'm not giving up that easy though here.

On 9/12/2014 7:01 PM, Jeff Francis™ jeff-CDdbmnNP9qodnm+***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] wrote:
> Don't worry, there's a lot to know about linux (though this isn't a
> normal problem, and it should have worked fine the way you did it).
> You can always trying the Windows trick of rebooting, though that's a
> lot less common fix in the linux world. It does work sometimes,
> though. Normally, just doing an install from the install GUI takes
> care of all the details behind the scenes, and you just run your
> program and enjoy. This is unusual.
>
>
>
> On Fri, Sep 12, 2014 at 4:57 PM, Lloyd xr250-***@public.gmane.org
> <mailto:xr250-***@public.gmane.org> [linuxham] <linuxham-***@public.gmane.org
> <mailto:linuxham-***@public.gmane.org>> wrote:
>
> I did this: "sudo apt-get install libportaudio2" It says
> "libportaudio2 is already the newest version." Zero changes
> needed or made. Yet it still says it's missing when I try to
> execute. Maybe the file is there but in the wrong location?
>
> Sorry I'm so green at this! I'm thinking that if the one click
> install works via the software manager, then I can't see how I
> could have screwed that up. Plus a subsequent reinstall from the
> terminal doesn't work either. Seems like I have a fundamental
> problem with Mint? May not be fixable with a new guy behind the
> wheel...
>
> On 9/12/2014 6:30 PM, Jeff Francis™ jeff-CDdbmnNP9qodnm+***@public.gmane.org
> <mailto:jeff-CDdbmnNP9qodnm+***@public.gmane.org> [linuxham] wrote:
>> I do, actually. He told us:
>>
>> "What I did before was search for FLDIGI under the software
>> manager, and did the one click install for FLDIGI."
>>
>> He's missing a dependency. Specifically, he's
>> missing libportaudio2. Doing a re-install using apt is the
>> easiest way to correct that for a new user. It will
>> automatically calculate what's missing and install it for you.
>> Yes, you could also do "sudo apt-get install libportaudio2". Or
>> do it from a GUI.
>>
>> The interesting question is how fldigi got installed in the
>> first place without the dependencies, but my assumption is that
>> he'd rather get it working than debug what went wrong in the
>> installation.
>>
>> If you have a different way, by all means, please offer it up,
>> but just because it might be different is no excuse to refer to
>> perfectly valid assistance as "guessing".
>>
>> Jeff N0GQ
>>
>>
>>
>> On Fri, Sep 12, 2014 at 4:20 PM, Ed autek-***@public.gmane.org
>> <mailto:autek-***@public.gmane.org> [linuxham] <linuxham-***@public.gmane.org
>> <mailto:linuxham-***@public.gmane.org>> wrote:
>>
>> On 09/12/2014 07:15 PM, Jeff Francis™ jeff-CDdbmnNP9qodnm+***@public.gmane.org
>> <mailto:jeff-CDdbmnNP9qodnm+***@public.gmane.org> [linuxham] wrote:
>> > That's odd, the installer should have taken care of the
>> dependencies for
>> > you. Try opening a shell and running:
>> >
>> > sudo apt-get install --reinstall fldigi
>> >
>> > If it somehow got installed without the correct libraries
>> (though you
>> > shouldn't be able to do that), this should fix it.
>> >
>> > Jeff N0GQ
>>
>> Please quit guessing. Do you know how he insatlled fldigi ??
>>
>> Ed W3NR
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> --
>> -=jeff=-
>
>
>
>
> --
> -=jeff=-
>
Ed autek-Wuw85uim5zDR7s880joybQ@public.gmane.org [linuxham]
2014-09-13 00:23:19 UTC
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On 09/12/2014 07:57 PM, Lloyd xr250-***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] wrote:
> I did this: "sudo apt-get install libportaudio2" It says "libportaudio2
> is already the newest version." Zero changes needed or made. Yet it
> still says it's missing when I try to execute. Maybe the file is there
> but in the wrong location?
>
> Sorry I'm so green at this! I'm thinking that if the one click install
> works via the software manager, then I can't see how I could have
> screwed that up. Plus a subsequent reinstall from the terminal doesn't
> work either. Seems like I have a fundamental problem with Mint? May
> not be fixable with a new guy behind the wheel...
>

Its always fixable.

Let's try thhis first.

sudo apt-get install libportaudiocpp0

See if that works.

Are using a 64 bit install of mint ?

Ed W3NR



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Posted by: Ed <autek-***@public.gmane.org>
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Lloyd xr250-rphTv4pjVZMJGwgDXS7ZQA@public.gmane.org [linuxham]
2014-09-13 00:33:38 UTC
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Raw Message
Yes, a 64 bit install.

Now this is interesting; I did as you suggested. It comes back "unable
to locate package libportaudiocppo"

On 9/12/2014 7:23 PM, Ed autek-***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] wrote:
>
> On 09/12/2014 07:57 PM, Lloyd xr250-***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] wrote:
> > I did this: "sudo apt-get install libportaudio2" It says "libportaudio2
> > is already the newest version." Zero changes needed or made. Yet it
> > still says it's missing when I try to execute. Maybe the file is there
> > but in the wrong location?
> >
> > Sorry I'm so green at this! I'm thinking that if the one click install
> > works via the software manager, then I can't see how I could have
> > screwed that up. Plus a subsequent reinstall from the terminal doesn't
> > work either. Seems like I have a fundamental problem with Mint? May
> > not be fixable with a new guy behind the wheel...
> >
>
> Its always fixable.
>
> Let's try thhis first.
>
> sudo apt-get install libportaudiocpp0
>
> See if that works.
>
> Are using a 64 bit install of mint ?
>
> Ed W3NR
>
>
Ed autek-Wuw85uim5zDR7s880joybQ@public.gmane.org [linuxham]
2014-09-13 00:39:32 UTC
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Raw Message
On 09/12/2014 08:33 PM, Lloyd xr250-***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] wrote:
> Yes, a 64 bit install.
>
> Now this is interesting; I did as you suggested. It comes back "unable
> to locate package libportaudiocppo"

That's zero, not oh.

For a new linux user I would suggest a 32 bit install. The version in
the repository is expecting a 32 bit system. There is no big benefit to
installing a 64 bit version.

Ed W3NR



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Posted by: Ed <autek-***@public.gmane.org>
------------------------------------
Lloyd xr250-rphTv4pjVZMJGwgDXS7ZQA@public.gmane.org [linuxham]
2014-09-13 01:32:10 UTC
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Ok, I successfully installed the package.

On 9/12/2014 7:39 PM, Ed autek-***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] wrote:
>
> On 09/12/2014 08:33 PM, Lloyd xr250-***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] wrote:
> > Yes, a 64 bit install.
> >
> > Now this is interesting; I did as you suggested. It comes back "unable
> > to locate package libportaudiocppo"
>
> That's zero, not oh.
>
> For a new linux user I would suggest a 32 bit install. The version in
> the repository is expecting a 32 bit system. There is no big benefit to
> installing a 64 bit version.
>
> Ed W3NR
>
>
Ed autek-Wuw85uim5zDR7s880joybQ@public.gmane.org [linuxham]
2014-09-13 00:33:55 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On 09/12/2014 08:23 PM, Ed autek-***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] wrote:
> On 09/12/2014 07:57 PM, Lloyd xr250-***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] wrote:
>> I did this: "sudo apt-get install libportaudio2" It says "libportaudio2
>> is already the newest version." Zero changes needed or made. Yet it
>> still says it's missing when I try to execute. Maybe the file is there
>> but in the wrong location?
>>
>> Sorry I'm so green at this! I'm thinking that if the one click install
>> works via the software manager, then I can't see how I could have
>> screwed that up. Plus a subsequent reinstall from the terminal doesn't
>> work either. Seems like I have a fundamental problem with Mint? May
>> not be fixable with a new guy behind the wheel...
>>
>
> Its always fixable.
>
> Let's try thhis first.
>
> sudo apt-get install libportaudiocpp0
>
> See if that works.
>
> Are using a 64 bit install of mint ?
>
> Ed W3NR
>
>

If that does not work, go here and follow the instructions to the letter.

http://www.w1hkj.com/LaunchpadInstall.html

or this

https://launchpad.net/~kamalmostafa/+archive/ubuntu/fldigi

Ed W3NR













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Posted by: Ed <autek-***@public.gmane.org>
------------------------------------
Richard Shaw hobbes1069-Re5JQEeQqe8AvxtiuMwx3w@public.gmane.org [linuxham]
2014-09-13 01:46:19 UTC
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On Fri, Sep 12, 2014 at 6:57 PM, Lloyd xr250-***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] <
linuxham-***@public.gmane.org> wrote:

>
> I did this: "sudo apt-get install libportaudio2" It says "libportaudio2
> is already the newest version." Zero changes needed or made. Yet it still
> says it's missing when I try to execute. Maybe the file is there but in
> the wrong location?
>

IF portaudio is installed correctly, the only way I can think of for this
to happen is if somehow ldconfig wasn't run as part of the fldigi install.
That would explain why it couldn't find the library...

Richard
Marty Hartwell mhartwe-Re5JQEeQqe8AvxtiuMwx3w@public.gmane.org [linuxham]
2014-09-12 22:57:22 UTC
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Raw Message
Hi Lloyd

I have seem many references to Mint 17 and Fldigi so my guess is
it is something with your installation. You didn't say how you installed
Fldigi, build or using repositories or different.
One way to find out what is going on is to open a terminal window and
just enter fldigi followed by an enter and see what the response is that
is shown on the screen. If nothing shows or it says fldigi not found, then
your installation didn't work.

Hope this helps.

Marty kd8bj


On 09/12/2014 05:38 PM, Lloyd xr250-***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] wrote:
>
> Hi,
> I'm new to Linux. I resurrected a dead laptop with Mint 17, and I love
> it! Works great, and I have Chirp working just fine. I tried to
> install FLDIGI. It says it is successfully installed, but it fails to
> open when clicked on. There is no error message indicating a problem.
> I tried to install more updates and libraries from the web. I'm
> learning how to use the terminal and successfully updated things, but it
> still will not start. There is a guy on Youtube who shows a one click
> install of FLDIGI on Mint 16. It works great for him.
>
> So, am I doing something wrong as a new Linux user, or is there a
> compatibility problem with Mint 17 and FLDIGI?
>
> So far I like Mint way better than windows. In particular, it loaded,
> and successfully connected Chirp to my radio on the first try!
>
> Thanks,
> Lloyd
> AI5H
>
>



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Posted by: Marty Hartwell <mhartwe-***@public.gmane.org>
------------------------------------
Ed autek-Wuw85uim5zDR7s880joybQ@public.gmane.org [linuxham]
2014-09-12 23:19:48 UTC
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On 09/12/2014 06:57 PM, Marty Hartwell mhartwe-***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] wrote:
> Hi Lloyd
>
> I have seem many references to Mint 17 and Fldigi so my guess is
> it is something with your installation. You didn't say how you installed
> Fldigi, build or using repositories or different.
> One way to find out what is going on is to open a terminal window and
> just enter fldigi followed by an enter and see what the response is that
> is shown on the screen. If nothing shows or it says fldigi not found, then
> your installation didn't work.
>
> Hope this helps.
>
> Marty kd8bj

Please do not guess at what the problem is unless you have specific info
relating to fldigi and mint17.

Ed W3NR



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Posted by: Ed <autek-***@public.gmane.org>
------------------------------------
Ed autek-Wuw85uim5zDR7s880joybQ@public.gmane.org [linuxham]
2014-09-12 22:57:08 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On 09/12/2014 06:38 PM, Lloyd xr250-***@public.gmane.org [linuxham] wrote:
> Hi,
> I'm new to Linux. I resurrected a dead laptop with Mint 17, and I love
> it! Works great, and I have Chirp working just fine. I tried to
> install FLDIGI. It says it is successfully installed, but it fails to
> open when clicked on. There is no error message indicating a problem.
> I tried to install more updates and libraries from the web. I'm
> learning how to use the terminal and successfully updated things, but it
> still will not start. There is a guy on Youtube who shows a one click
> install of FLDIGI on Mint 16. It works great for him.
>
> So, am I doing something wrong as a new Linux user, or is there a
> compatibility problem with Mint 17 and FLDIGI?
>
> So far I like Mint way better than windows. In particular, it loaded,
> and successfully connected Chirp to my radio on the first try!
>
> Thanks,
> Lloyd
> AI5H
>
>

How are you (did you) install fldigi ?

I've tested more versions of fldigi then you could ever imagine.

Works perfectly here with mint17.

As someone has already pointed out, start fldigi from a terminal and see
what, if any, errors there are.

We cannot help you sort things out without more info.

There are no compatibily issues what so ever..............

Ed W3NR



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Posted by: Ed <autek-***@public.gmane.org>
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